Bellevue Fire Erupts in Apartment Complex

BELLEVUE, Wash. – A fire broke out at a Factoria apartment complex on the afternoon of Sunday, April 22, 2018 from an unknown cause.

Photo Credit: Fire Photos (@Incidentphotos) Used with written permission

Firefighters quickly responded to the commercial fire on Sunday afternoon.  Exposures around the three-story complex located in the 12900 block and Newport Way were searched and found to be all clear.  Fire was knocked down and contained rapidly to several units.

A Bellevue Fire Investigator responded to the scene.

There were no reports of civilian or firefighter injuries.

Limited information has been found on this incident today.  We will provide updates as details become available.

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog

Commercial Fire Now 2nd Alarm in Federal Way, Washington

INCIDENT SUMMARY

Another large fire is plaguing the Southeast area of King County but this time it is a commercial structure fire located at 32300 4th Place South in Federal Way, Washington.

The fire originally reported as a first-alarm incident has now been elevated to another second alarm with some crews coming from Tacoma (Ladder 4) en route from Fife and Command requesting that all South King Fire units being recalled.  Some are being rerouted from the three-alarm fire of the old Heritage Building in Auburn.

FIRE TACTICS

Fire crews were busy conducting primary and secondary searches on all floor levels of the fire structure.  A structure on the Bravo side was one of the concerns but fire crews did a search and found no extension and nothing else found in the adjacent building.  Primary and secondary searches were conducted but nothing was found.

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS

One person was rescued from the structure and in the hands of Medics with CPR in progress.  One trusted source has reported Fire Officials reported one fatality.

SOCIAL MEDIA

We are using hashtag #FederalWayFire.

 

 

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

 

 

Senior Apartments in Milton Ablaze | 1

INCIDENT SUMMARY

East Pierce Firefighters were dispatched to the Alder Ridge Apartments located at 2800 Alder Street in Milton, Washington around 1828 hours this Tuesday evening (December 26th)  for a fire that broke out in this senior living community.  The fire was escalated rapidly to a 2nd alarm response.

Credit: East Pierce FD

EVACUATIONS

Seniors were all evacuated from the building around 1907 hours PST.  No injuries were reported.  There is approximately 150 displaced elderly residents from this Senior Assisted Living Facility.

FIRE TACTICS

Firefighters were in an offense fire attack as they were evacuating elderly residents from various apartments units.  Fire crews were reportedly going defensive as of 1938 hours and pulling out of the fire building.

Firefighters were making good progress on various area of the fire around 1957 hours PST.  Command advised crews to go offensive to attack and check the attic for any fire. around 1959 hours PST.  

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog – 12/26/2017 @ 2004 PST

Old Iconic Building Burning in Auburn, Washington | 1

AUBURN, WASHINGTON

Around 1530 hours PST, a fire broke out at the Old Heritage building located at 100 South Main Street in Auburn, Washington which is at the intersection of Auburn Way South and Main Street.   

The fire started on Tuesday, December 26, 2017, originally reported as flames from a dryer.  It would escalate from a first alarm to a third alarm very quickly.

Credit: King County Medic 1

RESOURCES

A large number of fire Resources from both King and Pierce Counties were promptly dispatched to the incident with personnel represented from Valley Regional FD, KCFD #44, East Pierce, Puget Sound Fire, South King Fire, Renton Fire, Tukwila Fire and Burien Fire.  Additional EMS units were dispatched from King County Medic One. 

FIRE TACTICS

When firefighters first arrived, they found heavy fire in the attic. They took offensive strategy due to the ceiling starting to collapse.  One person who was non-ambulatory was rescued and treated on-scene for smoke inhalation.  They were not transported.

Credit: Puget Sound Fire

ALARM COMPANIES

Here are the units deployed and which alarm they have been assigned to:

First Alarm | B31  CH32  E31  E32  E33  E38  L74  PIO32  B74  

Second Alarm | E61  E65  E71  E73  M6  MSO1  PCL113  R74 23PIO  23REHAB

Third Alarm | E62  E72  L11  L29  PCE118  Q75  E13  E17

Credit: Puget Sound Fire

EVACUATIONS

Neighbors in businesses and apartments have been evacuated for their safety and for fire crews.

Elderly residents were evacuated from their homes and buses were provided for them on 28th, which was the NW corner of their building.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Social Media is using the hashtags #MainFire #AuburnFire #heritagebldgfire for this incident.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog – 12/26/2017 @ 1920 Hours PST

Fire Damages Factoria Structure

UPDATE – 0911 hours PST

BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON | A fire broke out at an apartment complex located in the 12800 block of SE 40th in the Factoria area of Bellevue, Washington early Christmas morning.   Access into the fire scene was difficult due to snow and ice.  The fire occurred in between 0400 – 0430 hours PST.

(Written permission has been granted to republish this feed.  Credit:  Snoco_Radio (@Stringing Photog)

A cause is unknown at the time of this post.

Bellevue Fire stated about 5-6 patients were evaluated with 4 being transported to nearby hospital(s).  Many were injured in the fall, when they were jumping out of windows.

Six units were heavily damaged and not inhabitable.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

 

Fire Damages Factoria Structure

BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON | A fire broke out at an apartment complex located in the 12800 block of SE 40th in the Factoria area of Bellevue, Washington early Christmas morning.   Some residents jumping out of windows as the fierce fire consumed parts of the structure were reported on this snowy morning in the wee hours on Monday (around 0400-0430 hours PST).

A cause is unknown at the time of this post.

Four patients were transported to area hospitals related to evacuating from the building. No word on their conditions are known at this time.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

 

On The Eleventh Day of Christmas …..

The (Wild)Fire Season gave to thee…..

11 Wildland Firefighters

10 Strike Teams Responding…

9 Copters Dropping…   

8 Water Tenders Supplying…

7 Fire Logistics Dispatchers Ordering…

6 Helitack Crews Rappelling…

5 I M T ‘ s….

4 Bulldozers Dozing…

3 Incident Command Posts….

2 Fire Chasers….

And A  Serious Fire Blogger….

(c) 2017 The NW Fire Blog – Written / Photography Content. Also written by (Becki Coates)

On The Tenth Day of Christmas …..

The (Wild)Fire Season gave to thee…..

10 Strike Teams Responding…

9 Copters Dropping…   

8 Water Tenders Supplying…

7 Fire Logistics Dispatchers Ordering…

6 Helitack Crews Rappelling…

5 I M T ‘ s….

4 Bulldozers Dozing…

3 Incident Command Posts….

2 Fire Chasers….

And A  Serious Fire Blogger….

(c) 2017 The NW Fire Blog – Written / Photography Content. Also written by (Becki Coates)

Fire History Remembered: Seattle Fire’s Station #36

Seattle, Washington | Seattle Fire Department’s rich fire history has been recorded from year-to-year that dates back to July 6, 1876, when it was an all-volunteer company named Seattle Engine Company No. 1. It was organized by a group of citizens convinced of their own growing town’s need for a dedicated fire-suppression organization. Various fire companies were visible in providing private services until 1883 when the City Charter was amended to create and fund equipment but not staff for a centralized Fire Department.

Seattle Fire’s first Fire Chief was Gardner Kellogg of the new established volunteer organization in 1889 and acting Fire Marshal in 1901.  The volunteer organization survived into the late 1880’s, even during the Great Seattle Fire of 1889 which destroyed 30 city blocks and caused $12-$16 Million in damages.  Soon after, the City acknowledged the part-time force did not have enough fire-suppression resources to meet their expanding need for fire protection and found itself the recipients of heavy pressure from the insurance industry and its own citizens.  Ordinance No. 1212 in 1889 was passed by the Council which converted Seattle’s seven volunteer companies into a paid, professional of 32 men and into five fire districts.

Item No. 2688, West Seattle Fire Station No. 36, 23rd Avenue and Spokane Street, Seattle Fire Department Central Files, Record Series 2613-07. Seattle Municipal Archives. (1927)

Decades would soon pass after the creation of the professional Seattle Fire Department bringing a rapid increase in size and resources, as well as a higher rise in its resident population.  In 1890, the population was recorded at 42,000 and showing a massive increase to 237,000 by 1910.  In 1891, many iconic developments occurred with its maritime fire unit inception and with the deployment of their fire boat Snoqualmie in 1891, horse-drawn resources transitioned over to motorized fire engines in 1924 and development of firefighter-staffed emergency response aid cars were implemented during the 1930’s.  They were also members of the historic founding of the IAFF in 1918 and became Charter members of their Department’s union Local 27, one 218 in the organization.

The Seattle Fire Department has moved away from just providing fire-suppression efforts as it did in its earlier days to critical services such as, building inspections, fire code enforcement, tactical rescues and public education.  It is a fire-based two-tier response system providing pre-hospital BLS and ALS support services. There are six paramedic provider programs with SFD operating Seattle Medic One.  The Department protects both lives and properties of their 634,535 residents and 768,000 during the day in a 83.9 square mile area including 193 miles (53 miles of tidal waters).  It is listed at #22 on the Cities with populations of 100,000 and greater).

The Fire Department presents itself with 981 uniformed fire personnel with 207 on-duty strength, 38 Department Chiefs, 981 EMTs, 76 Paramedics and 84 non-uniformed (civilian) personnel.  Additionally, There are 34 Fire Stations (Medic One HQ at Harborview Medical Center).  There are 33 fire engines including on-duty Fire Boat, 12 Ladder Trucks, 4 Aid Units (BLS), 2 Air Trucks, 4 Fire Boats and 2 Hose Wagons.

Seattle Fire’s Station #36 is located at 3600 23rd Avenue SW, Seattle.  This photo was taken in 1927.  Presently, the station houses one engine company (E36), the department’s tunnel rescue unit and a marine specialty unit which serves the south end and in the Harbor Island/Delridge neighborhood community.

It was one of 32 neighborhood fire stations that was upgraded, renovated or replaced through the fire Facilities and Emergency Response Program which was approved by Seattle voters in 2003.  This facility built-in 1971 was in general fair condition but required some seismic retrofits to meet current earthquake safety standards.  Remodeling to enhance its operations was also part of the $1.7 million project.

IMG_0090

Photo Credit: Seattle Fire Department (2014)

Some of the great station’s features are:  bay space for two fire apparatus including the marine specialty unit, a decon/clean room, maintenance work area and battery charging alcove, storage for major disaster supplies and EMS equipment and hose dryer and storage alcove.  For Admin/Crew areas, there is a station office, bunker gear room, beanery (kitchen) and dining room, weight/workout room, firefighter bunk rooms, toilet/shower rooms and laundry facilities.

As of 2015, E36 had 916 total responses with BLS response times of 4:38 minutes and ALS response times of 4:33 minutes.  Fires were 5:52 minutes.  Times have changed since then but no data is available at time of this posting.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Sources:  SFD (11/2014), Seattle.gov Archived Documents,Wikipedia

#ThrowBackThursday | Sutherland Canyon Fire

THROWBACK THURSDAY | This new post title is all about stepping back in time and viewing some of the 2017 Fire Season’s wildfires that scorched many of our NW landscapes and making its own path of destruction.  Today’s fire is the Sutherand Canyon Fires that burned in and near Wenatchee, Washington State in June of this year.

170628 Sutherland Canyon Fire

Sutherland Canyon Fire is showing its fierce side. Photo taken on June 28, 2017. (Credit: Richard Parrish/BLM)

INCIDENT SUMMARY

The Sutherland Canyon Fire ignited on June 26, 2017, around midnight on a Monday from lightning that touched the area causing multiple grass fires.  The fires were located about 9-20 miles south Wenatchee in the counties of Chelan, Grant and Douglas.

The fires were burning on land owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WA DNR) and private lands.  The fire was also said to have destroyed critical sage and grouse habitat.

MULTIPLE FIRES IGNITED.

ALCOA FIRE

June 26, 2017.   Alcoa Hwy near Junction Ridge started on June 26, 2017.  100 firefighters assigned. Grass, brushy fuels.  500 acres. 0% contained. Level 2  evacuations in process. Limited updates.

SUTHERLAND CANYON FIRES

170701 Sutherland Canyon Fire

June 27, 2017.  The Sutherland Canyon Fires was located 8 miles SE of Wenatchee and had 75 personnel assigned.  3,000 acres burned. This was made up of five smaller fires collectively under this single wildfire name. Level 2 evacuation levels were in effect.

June 28, 2017.  No update.

170701 Sutherland Canyon Fire

Fire is seen racing up the hillside of the Sutherland Canyon Fire on June 28, 2017. 

June 29, 2017.  The fire had expanded and was considered to be very complex.  The Northwest Team 11, a Type 2 IMT Team would become the new face of Command under IC, Nathan Rabe.  His team took command at 0600 hours on this date.  Fire had now burned up to 47,500 acres and had a 20% containment status. This fire was now reportedly burning 15 miles south of East Wenatchee.  275 personnel were assigned.

170701 Sutherland Canyon Fire

Red Flag weather conditions create active fire behavior as seen in this photo of the Sutherland Canyon Fire on June 29, 2017.

It was also said that on this second day in a row, RED FLAG conditions were warranted due to dry and gusty winds and due to extreme fire growth in steep and rugged terrain.  Both the Sutherland Canyon Fire and the Straight Hollow Fire merged into a single wildfire at the east and southeast flanks displaying the most active fire behavior in both of these locations.  Overnight, firefighters and bulldozers worked to construct and hold fire containment lines where they could engage the fire in a safe manner.  Fire officials were working to keep the fire from spreading towards nearby town of Quincy.

June 30, 2017.  Due to more accurate mapping and better visibility by aerial recon flights, the number of acres was reduced and discovered that the Sutherland  Canyon and the Straight Hollow fires did not actually merge together.  However, they were found to be burning 1/4 miles apart from one another.   The Incident Command Post or ICP was felt it necessary to move to the Quincy High School campus so that they could be closer to both fires.  Fire was now located 6 miles NW of Quincy. There had been 29,433 acres scorched and was now being reported as having a 50% containment.

July 1, 2017.  Fire Managers reported the fire was now at a 74% containment and holding at 29,433 acres.

July 2, 2017.  The fire was holding at 29,433 acres with a 90% containment status. This was said to be the last fire update.

STRAIGHT HOLLOW FIRE

June 30, 2017.  This fire was reported about 1/4 mile from the Sutherland Canyon fire.  11 miles northwest of Quincy.  8,458 acres. 75% contained.  It had been reported that this fire had merged into directly to the Sutherland Canyon Fire but later was determined not to be the case.

July 1, 2017.  Fire crews were still showing the fire was holding at 8,458 acres with a 75% containment status.

July 2, 2017.  8,458 acres. Containment status increased to 90%. No increase in acreage and minimal fire behavior observed.  Fire crews conducted patrolling, mop-up and repair operations. Additionally, repair work included building water bars, smoothing out berms and repairing fences cut during fire suppression efforts.  Aerial recon flights with infrared imaging equipment checked various areas for heat signatures. The Temporary Flight Restriction or TFR was lifted over the fire.  The NW Team 11 unit transitioned over to a local Type 3 IMT on Monday, July 3, 2017.

This was the final fire update.

SPARTAN FIRE

June 27, 2017.  The Spartan Fire was a second fire that ignited on June 26.  It was located five miles SE of Wenatchee with the same fire fuels.  160 firefighters were assigned including handcrews and dozers.  4,500 acres. 10% contained.  Active fire spread to the southwest.

170626 Spartan Fire

A USFS handcrew preps to work overnight on the Spartan Fire. Photo taken on June 26, 2017. (Credit: Holly Krake/USFS)

June 28, 2017.  No update.

June 29, 2017.  The fire grew to 9,000 acres scorched and had a 60% containment status.  It was now located nine miles SE of Wenatchee.  There were 50 personnel assigned.   Fire Officials were happy to report that all containment lines held and no new fire growth overnight. Crews were tasked with actively monitoring potential hotspots and patches of unburned grass within the fire perimeter.

170626 Planning

In order to lead and organize their fire crews, Interagency fire managers must work together to come up with a plan. Here they are working together doing just that. Spartan Fire on June 26, 2017. (Credit: Holly Krake/USFS)

June 30, 2017.  Fire activity showing minimal activity and that all containment lines continue to hold.  Crews were tasked with patrol and to begin repairing of fire line used during suppression efforts.  Two 24-hour shifts of fire crews have been assigned.

July 1, 2017.  The fire was deemed to have a 100% containment status and listed 8,730 acres burned.  Fire command was turned back over to a local fire jurisdiction which included Chelan FD and WA State DNR) at 0600 on Saturday.  This would be the last fire update from NW Team 11.

170629 Retardant Drop

Fire suppression from the air assists those on the ground as well, Without this resource would make ground crews’ jobs much more difficult.

RESOURCES

Multiple fire agencies came together for a single purpose – put the wildfire out.   The Incident Cooperators for this event was the BLM, Chelan County Office of Emergency Chelan Co OEM), Chelan County Fire District 6, Chelan County Sheriff Office and WA DNR.

EVACUATIONS

On June 29, 2017, Grant County had Level 2 evacuations in order for residents in parts of NW Quincy and southwest of Monument Hill.  Douglas County would instill Level 3 orders for those along the Palisades Road corridor and at the Hwy 28 Junction.  Level 2 were in effect for the Trinidad area along Mansfield Rd.  A church and the Humane Society opened their doors for people and their pets, as shelters.  Chelan County issued Level 1 orders for the Colockum Road, Kingsbury Road, Moss Carr Road, Ingersoll Road and Tarpiscan Road.

On June 30th, all evacuation orders were lifted.

SMOKE IMPACTS

Smoke impacts on June 29, 2017 were expected to spread to the east towards Quincy and reaching possibly to the furthest areas such as Spokane and Moses Lake.  It was likely that the light canyon winds would push up  the smoke into the Wenatchee Valley.

WILDFIRE STATS

FIRE FACT: In 2017, there were a total of 2,079 human-caused wildfires burning 262,328 total acres in WA & OR. OR: 906 fires, 172,887 acres WA: 1173 fires, 89,441 acres  year-to-date.

is everything.

FIRE IMAGES

All Fire Images not listing a Photo Credit underneath are due to multiple images used by the same Photographer/Source.  We give full photo credit to WA DNR – SE Region via Inciweb.  All photo credits have been given to the best of our ability.  We give KUDOS to the men and women behind the camera showcasing firefighters in action from the air and on the ground.

[Source:  GACC/NWCC]

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog