Firefighters Respond to 2-Alarm Fire in Seattle

Seattle, WA | Firefighters were dispatched at 1048 hours PST this morning to the 4500 block of University Way NE for a fire in a building.  The building is the venue to the Hunan Chinese Kitchen Delivery formerly the Silk Road Noodle Bar restaurant, according to Yelp.

Units Dispatched

Battalions: 2, 4, 6.

Engines:  2, 9, 16, 17, 18, 22, 25, 38, 40.

Ladders: 1, 4, 5, 8, 10.

Medic/Aid Units:  M18, A25, M31, M44. REHAB1.

Staff:  Safety2, Staff10, PIO, MAR5. Deputy1.

Air Units:  10, 240, 260.

Cause

Marshal 5, Seattle’s FIU investigative unit is currently working through the fire scene with the help of Firefighters, as they help him move things around.  At this time, there is no preliminary cause of this fire.

Fire Activities

Seattle Fire’s Ladder 1. (c) NW Fire Blog (stock photo)

We picked up active scanner feed via the Seattle Fire radio transmissions about twenty minutes into the incident.  The command name is “University Command”.

At 1117 hours PST, Engine 25’s crew was tasked with a primary search on floor 2. They reported their progress was about 3/4 way through and had zero visibility. Hydraulic ventilation was also reported by another crew.

A large skylight that ran down the whole length of the fire building on the Alpha side seemed to play a key role in some of the obstacles firefighters faced.  At 1124 hours, it was determined there was no fire in the attic.

After careful inspection and 4×4 cuts on the Charlie/Delta corner, there was no extension into the Delta exposure building.

A primary search of floor was conducted at 1127 hours and an all clear was called.  Ladder 1 pulled ceilings in the Charlie / Delta corner and reported an all clear.  E25 reported a little fire in the cockloft. They were working on getting water on the fire.

Command to Dispatch reported that the fire was under control at 1130 hours with a completed primary search with an all clear and vertical ventilation had been started.

No heat was found in the ceilings but a heat signature was found due to hot spots in the interior walls at 1136 hours PST.

Division 2 reported no fire in the  northern rooms, overhaul had been completed and E2 crew was exiting due to low air.  New replacements would be deployed by Command. A tap fire was reported to Command.

Smoke began to clear on the Bravo / Delta side at 1148 hours.

A secondary search on the Floor 2 was conducted by E18 at 1152 hours.

Units began returning back into service at 1153 were Air260, Engines 2, 18, 25, Ladders 4, 5, 1 and the PIO.

At 1233 hours, power had not been secured yet and therefore fire crews were notified that the building was still energized.

Some remaining fire crews are still on-scene and remain until Command is terminated.  More information will be updated as it is received.

Thank you for reading our post and visiting our Blog. We appreciate you!

(c) 2019 NW Fire Blog

 

SODO Commercial Structure Seriously Damaged by Fire | 2

SEATTLE, Wash. – A commercial building located in the 3600 block of E Marginal Way South in the SODO industrial area and near the main arterial Spokane Street, caught fire on Wednesday, July 4, 2018.

Fire was from an unknown ignition causing massive damage to the 3651 Warehouse building – an Event Rental Space building. (per Google Maps and Seattle’s CAD exact address given)

Fire seen from Coulon Park in Renton, Washington | Photo Credit: Diego A Santiago

RESOURCES

Seattle Fire dispatched the following units on July 4th at 1903 hours (PDT) for both the initial and 2nd Alarm companies:

E13, L17, B5, E36, A14, AIR10, B7, DEP1, E27, E30, E32, E5, E6, L11, L3, M10, M44, MAR5, REHAB1, SAFT2, STAF 10, B5, E36, E13, L7

FIRE TACTICS

Here are some of the highlights from the actual fire call as we focused on live coverage on both of our Facebook (@nwfireblog) and Twitter (@nwfireblog) pages.

Water  Supply

In the early stages of the structure fire, firefighters quickly set up water supplies in various areas around the fire building.  One of several were established with the first one where lines were laid over Burlington RR tracks (the RR was notified). A second one was established in Division Bravo, protecting an exposure building to the South. A third location which they laid 1,000 feet of a hose line to the nearest hydrant.

Command

Command made sure all fire crews were aware of his fire objectives when At 40 minutes into the fire, he stated they were working to knock down the fire and make sure there were no extension through the fire wall on the Alpha side.  They wanted to save the front of the building and stopping any extension. They wanted to go for a maximum flow in Division Bravo and Delta.

Ladder 3 was assigned as the RIT team.

50 minutes on the incident clock (1955 hours)

Ladder 7 would experience a mechanical failure in which the aerial could no longer pump water from its aerial.

70 minutes on the incident clock (2015 hours)

Division Alpha

Firefighters were working successfully with 2 1/2″ hand lines on the exterior side in defensive fire operations.

Division Bravo

Engine 5 became the supply line to Ladder 7 on the Charlie side from the Bravo side. They were busy helping Ladder 7 establish Ladder Pipe Operations, along with Ladder 1.

L1 was located at the Alpha/Bravo of the exposure building.  More resources were needed for manpower.  A 3rd Alarm was called by the IC but was later cancelled.

E25 set up a 2 1/2″ dry hose line to L7. (2000 hours)

Fire was knocked down on the Bravo / Charlie side. Some crews were sent to REHAB for recycling.

Fire was knocked down completely in the Charlie side with no extensions. (2007)

City Light arrived in this Division and helped shutdown all power lines.

Units in the Division Bravo area included L1, L7 (Alpha), E27, E6, B6, E5 and E2.

Division Charlie

Aid 14 was assisting L7 with Ladder Pipe Operations but was recalled to the  Command Post.  Another unit would come in and continue with assistance.

Fire was knocked down (1950 hours).

L17 Team Bravo was assigned to Division Charlie.  A 2 1/2″ line was put in on Charlie from Delta side.  They were working on assisting with putting out car fires.

Division Delta

E13 was located on the Charlie/Delta exposure side where a fence was located. Their needs for (2) 2 1/2″ to help save the building on the corner of the exposure building.

Cars in the rear of the building were catching on fire.  The IC cancelled the 3rd Alarm due to firefighters were fighting defensively and not going interior.

They were making good progress and would later shutdown L7 (Alpha) ladder pipe operations and to implement a reassessment.

Rooftop Operations

Firefighters were on the most Southern rooftop and could see the fire building on their stable operating platform. They observed the roof caved in on the Fire building but that others were not affected.

Due to their good location, they stated they could hit the fire building safely from the rooftop with (2) 2 1/2″ lines safely.

Engine 25 Officer would become assume Rooftop Operations (2013).

REHAB Operations

REHAB Operations was established to help rehydrate firefighters with water, healthy foods and in conjunction with Medical Group in making sure crews are assessed for medical reasons.  They are generally grouped together with the Seattle Fire Buffs and near the Seattle Fire Air Unit.

Fire PIO

A presser was released by the Seattle Fire Department stating that the main body of fire has been put out but fire crews will remain on scene working on spot fires throughout the night into the following day.

The fire was contained to one commercial building.

Fire investigators will be investigating the cause.  There is no preliminary cause known at this time.

No injuries were reported to civilians or firefighters.

Image may contain: tree and outdoor

Seattle Fire’s Ladder 1 (Stock Photo) | (c) NW Fire Blog

Social Media

We have seen reports that this was a “Junkyard” Fire and another stated it was a 4-Alarm fire.  We can confirm this was a commercial structure fire and only a 2-Alarm.  It was a 3-Alarm for a very short time but then it was cancelled by Command as they stated they weren’t going interior operations.

As many of you know, we work to try to provide the best and most accurate details of any fire-related/Public Safety/Emergency/Disaster event we cover or write about.  We generally glean information from verified sources before we publish.  There are many versions of this fire incident in the news and through eyewitness throughout the Seattle area.

Editor’s Message(s):

We thank you for reading our post and understanding how this fire unfolded.  We send our sincere condolences to those whom may be affected by the fire from the owners down to Management to the employees.

Special Thank Yous to all of the Seattle Fire crews who worked in dangerous fire and weather conditions to get this fire out and for those who will spend their 4th of July on Fire Watch throughout the night.

To those who support the Fire Service, including the Dispatchers and Fire Buffs (REHAB Support) who took part in this incident. Your engaging efforts were well received and appreciated.  You all did a great and amazing job.

To the Seattle Police Officers that handled Traffic Control and other assigned duties.  We appreciate your dedication and service.

 

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog – Updated 2330 hours PDT 

SODO Commercial Structure Seriously Damaged by Fire | 1

SEATTLE, Wash. – A commercial building located in the 3600 block of E Marginal Way South in the SODO industrial area and near the main arterial Spokane Street, caught fire on Wednesday, July 4, 2018.

Fire was from an unknown ignition causing massive damage to the 3651 Warehouse building – an Event Rental Space building. (per Google Maps and Seattle’s CAD exact address given)

RESOURCES

Seattle Fire dispatched the following units on July 4th at 1903 hours (PDT) for both the initial and 2nd Alarm companies:

E13, L17, B5, E36, A14, AIR10, B7, DEP1, E27, E30, E32, E5, E6, L11, L3, M10, M44, MAR5, REHAB1, SAFT2, STAF 10, B5, E36, E13, L7

FIRE TACTICS

Here are some of the highlights from the actual fire call as we focused on live coverage on both of our Facebook (@nwfireblog) and Twitter (@nwfireblog) pages.

Water  Supply

In the early stages of the structure fire, firefighters quickly set up water supplies in various areas around the fire building.  One of several were established with the first one where lines were laid over Burlington RR tracks (the RR was notified). A second one was established in Division Bravo, protecting an exposure building to the South. A third location which they laid 1,000 feet of a hose line to the nearest hydrant.

Command

Command made sure all fire crews were aware of his fire objectives when At 40 minutes into the fire, he stated they were working to knock down the fire and make sure there were no extension through the fire wall on the Alpha side.  They wanted to save the front of the building and stopping any extension. They wanted to go for a maximum flow in Division Bravo and Delta.

Ladder 3 was assigned as the RIT team.

50 minutes on the incident clock (1955 hours)

Ladder 7 would experience a mechanical failure in which the aerial could no longer pump water from its aerial.

70 minutes on the incident clock (2015 hours)

Division Alpha

Firefighters were working successfully with 2 1/2″ hand lines on the exterior side in defensive fire operations.

Division Bravo

Engine 5 became the supply line to Ladder 7 on the Charlie side from the Bravo side. They were busy helping Ladder 7 establish Ladder Pipe Operations, along with Ladder 1.

L1 was located at the Alpha/Bravo of the exposure building.  More resources were needed for manpower.  A 3rd Alarm was called by the IC but was later cancelled.

E25 set up a 2 1/2″ dry hose line to L7. (2000 hours)

Fire was knocked down on the Bravo / Charlie side. Some crews were sent to REHAB for recycling.

Fire was knocked down completely in the Charlie side with no extensions. (2007)

City Light arrived in this Division and helped shutdown all power lines.

Units in the Division Bravo area included L1, L7 (Alpha), E27, E6, B6, E5 and E2.

Division Charlie

Aid 14 was assisting L7 with Ladder Pipe Operations but was recalled to the  Command Post.  Another unit would come in and continue with assistance.

Fire was knocked down (1950 hours).

L17 Team Bravo was assigned to Division Charlie.  A 2 1/2″ line was put in on Charlie from Delta side.  They were working on assisting with putting out car fires.

Division Delta

E13 was located on the Charlie/Delta exposure side where a fence was located. Their needs for (2) 2 1/2″ to help save the building on the corner of the exposure building.

Cars in the rear of the building were catching on fire.  The IC cancelled the 3rd Alarm due to firefighters were fighting defensively and not going interior.

They were making good progress and would later shutdown L7 (Alpha) ladder pipe operations and to implement a reassessment.

Rooftop Operations

Firefighters were on the most Southern rooftop and could see the fire building on their stable operating platform. They observed the roof caved in on the Fire building but that others were not affected.

Due to their good location, they stated they could hit the fire building safely from the rooftop with (2) 2 1/2″ lines safely.

Engine 25 Officer would become assume Rooftop Operations (2013).

REHAB Operations

REHAB Operations was established to help rehydrate firefighters with water, healthy foods and in conjunction with Medical Group in making sure crews are assessed for medical reasons.  They are generally grouped together with the Seattle Fire Buffs and near the Seattle Fire Air Unit.

Social Media

We have seen reports that this was a “Junkyard” Fire and another stated it was a 4-Alarm fire.  We can confirm this was a commercial structure fire and only a 2-Alarm.  It was a 3-Alarm for a very short time but then it was cancelled by Command as they stated they weren’t going interior operations.

As many of you know, we work to try to provide the best and most accurate details of any fire-related/Public Safety/Emergency/Disaster event we cover or write about.  We generally glean information from verified sources before we publish.  There are many versions of this fire incident in the news and through eyewitness throughout the Seattle area.

Editor’s Message(s):

We thank you for reading our post and understanding how this fire unfolded.  We send our sincere condolences to those whom may be affected by the fire from the owners down to Management to the employees.

Special Thank Yous to all of the Seattle Fire crews who worked in dangerous fire and weather conditions to get this fire out and for those who will spend their 4th of July on Fire Watch throughout the night.

To those who support the Fire Service, including the Dispatchers and Fire Buffs (REHAB Support) who took part in this incident. Your engaging efforts were well received and appreciated.  You all did a great and amazing job.

To the Seattle Police Officers that handled Traffic Control and other assigned duties.  We appreciate your dedication and service.

 

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog – Updated 2240 hours PDT

Seattle Fights Large Barge Fire

SEATTLE, Wash. – On Tuesday, June 26, 2018, Firefighters were dispatched to a fully engulfed scrapped car barge fire moored at the Seattle and Iron Metal Corp. dock. The commercial fire was located in the 600 block of South Myrtle Street in the Georgetown area.

SIT REP

The fire incident was quickly elevated to a 2-Alarm fire response bringing more Chiefs, personnel, equipment and more fire boats.

Image may contain: outdoor

Photo Credit | David Sonsteng (Written permission granted)

RESOURCES

The following Seattle fire resources were dispatched immediately, which they quickly engaged the fire.

MRN1, FRB5, A14, E28, L3, E27, L1, L11, SAFT2, STAF10, DEP1, R1, FIREBOAT, AIR10, FRB4, A2, M1, E11, L7, B5, E6, A10, E36, REHAB1, E13, M28, PTRL4, B7, B5, MAR5, PIO, E32, E10.

INCIDENT COOPERATORS

Seattle Fire personnel.

City of Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and Office staff.

Image may contain: sky, ocean, outdoor and water

Photo Credit | David Sonsteng (Written permission granted)

Seattle SPU arrived to the fire scene with their main focus on assessing the Duwamish River.

The Department of Ecology stated they observed no oil sheen and did not observe distressed wildlife on the Duwamish River on Wednesday morning, June 27, 2018.  They did say there was a small amount of firefighting foam at the tide line.  The barge is boomed as a precaution.

Barge moored along river bank, crane in background, orange boom in foreground.

Photo Credit | WA Dept. of Ecology

CAUSE

Fire Investigators have ruled the cause as accidental and with damages at $1,000,000.

INJURIES

Two firefighters were reported to have been injured after suffering minor injuries and were treated at a nearby unnamed (most likely Harborview Medical Center) hospital.

Image may contain: sky, outdoor and water

Photo Credit | David Sonsteng (Written permission granted)

SOCIAL MEDIA

Social Media became ablaze with barge fire photos being posted all over the Twitter and Facebook.

Photos portrayed a huge black smoke column seen from areas such as Capitol Hill, West Seattle, South Seattle, seen on 1st Avenue South bridge, from north of the Seattle Boeing plant, Seatac Airport, Magnolia and by others on the outskirts of this large City.

If you are seeing smoke to the East (via from West Seattle).  It is a barge on fire with metal and propane on the Duwamish River.”

Seattle Fire Department says the fire is mostly out and that they train for these types of large fire incidents.” – SFD Presser

We are aware of the large barge fire. We are monitoring the situation and will respond as needed.” – USCG Pacific Northwest

ABOUT DAVID SONSTENG, PHOTOGRAPHER

Want more great photos?  Check out David Sonsteng, Photographer and Owner of DJ Sonsteng Photography on his Facebook Page @djsonstengphotography or on Instagram at @d.j.sonsteng.photography.

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog – Updated at 0540 PDT

Seattle Fire Activity Log | May 24, 2018

SEATTLE, Wa. – Want to know what is happening in a City near you?  Here is Thursday’s recap for the City of Seattle Fire Department.

0133 | Fire in Building | 5900 block x E Marginal Way S | Light smoke seen. Fire extinguished around 0146. Units went back into service quickly.  Cause under investigation.  Dispatched E26 FIREEBOAT L7 A14 AIR9 B2 B7 DEP1 E11 E13 E36 E5 E6 L1 L3 M28 M44 REHAB1 SAFT2 STAF10.

Image may contain: one or more people

Stock Photo | Credit: NW Fire Blog

0202 | Fire in Single Res | 11000 block x Beacon ave S | Detached garage fully engulfed. 2 Alarm fire. PIO immediately dispatched.  Cause under investigation.  Dispatched E33 B2 E27 L12 E28 A14 AIR9 B7 DEP1 E27 E36 L1 M28 M44 MAR5 SAFT2 STAF10

0817 | Fire in Single Res | 900 block x 38th Avenue | L3 initially dispatched to scene. Full response immediately called.  Fire started in a dishwasher.  Fire was immediately under control by firefighters.  Smoke alarms alerted owner by phone. Dispatched A5 AIR9 B2 B5 DEP1 E10 E25 E34 E6 L10 M10 M44 MAR5 SAFT2 STAF10

1218 |  Brush Fire | Airport Way S x S Royal Brougham Way | Dispatched unit was E27. Unknown cause. Limited details.

1518 | Car Fire | 9700 block x Aurora Ave N | E31 dispatched.

1818 | Brush Fire | 3600 block x NE 105th Street | E40 dispatched.

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog – Updated 1910 hours PDT

 

Fire History Remembered: Seattle Fire’s Station #36

Seattle, Washington | Seattle Fire Department’s rich fire history has been recorded from year-to-year that dates back to July 6, 1876, when it was an all-volunteer company named Seattle Engine Company No. 1. It was organized by a group of citizens convinced of their own growing town’s need for a dedicated fire-suppression organization. Various fire companies were visible in providing private services until 1883 when the City Charter was amended to create and fund equipment but not staff for a centralized Fire Department.

Seattle Fire’s first Fire Chief was Gardner Kellogg of the new established volunteer organization in 1889 and acting Fire Marshal in 1901.  The volunteer organization survived into the late 1880’s, even during the Great Seattle Fire of 1889 which destroyed 30 city blocks and caused $12-$16 Million in damages.  Soon after, the City acknowledged the part-time force did not have enough fire-suppression resources to meet their expanding need for fire protection and found itself the recipients of heavy pressure from the insurance industry and its own citizens.  Ordinance No. 1212 in 1889 was passed by the Council which converted Seattle’s seven volunteer companies into a paid, professional of 32 men and into five fire districts.

Item No. 2688, West Seattle Fire Station No. 36, 23rd Avenue and Spokane Street, Seattle Fire Department Central Files, Record Series 2613-07. Seattle Municipal Archives. (1927)

Decades would soon pass after the creation of the professional Seattle Fire Department bringing a rapid increase in size and resources, as well as a higher rise in its resident population.  In 1890, the population was recorded at 42,000 and showing a massive increase to 237,000 by 1910.  In 1891, many iconic developments occurred with its maritime fire unit inception and with the deployment of their fire boat Snoqualmie in 1891, horse-drawn resources transitioned over to motorized fire engines in 1924 and development of firefighter-staffed emergency response aid cars were implemented during the 1930’s.  They were also members of the historic founding of the IAFF in 1918 and became Charter members of their Department’s union Local 27, one 218 in the organization.

The Seattle Fire Department has moved away from just providing fire-suppression efforts as it did in its earlier days to critical services such as, building inspections, fire code enforcement, tactical rescues and public education.  It is a fire-based two-tier response system providing pre-hospital BLS and ALS support services. There are six paramedic provider programs with SFD operating Seattle Medic One.  The Department protects both lives and properties of their 634,535 residents and 768,000 during the day in a 83.9 square mile area including 193 miles (53 miles of tidal waters).  It is listed at #22 on the Cities with populations of 100,000 and greater).

The Fire Department presents itself with 981 uniformed fire personnel with 207 on-duty strength, 38 Department Chiefs, 981 EMTs, 76 Paramedics and 84 non-uniformed (civilian) personnel.  Additionally, There are 34 Fire Stations (Medic One HQ at Harborview Medical Center).  There are 33 fire engines including on-duty Fire Boat, 12 Ladder Trucks, 4 Aid Units (BLS), 2 Air Trucks, 4 Fire Boats and 2 Hose Wagons.

Seattle Fire’s Station #36 is located at 3600 23rd Avenue SW, Seattle.  This photo was taken in 1927.  Presently, the station houses one engine company (E36), the department’s tunnel rescue unit and a marine specialty unit which serves the south end and in the Harbor Island/Delridge neighborhood community.

It was one of 32 neighborhood fire stations that was upgraded, renovated or replaced through the fire Facilities and Emergency Response Program which was approved by Seattle voters in 2003.  This facility built-in 1971 was in general fair condition but required some seismic retrofits to meet current earthquake safety standards.  Remodeling to enhance its operations was also part of the $1.7 million project.

IMG_0090

Photo Credit: Seattle Fire Department (2014)

Some of the great station’s features are:  bay space for two fire apparatus including the marine specialty unit, a decon/clean room, maintenance work area and battery charging alcove, storage for major disaster supplies and EMS equipment and hose dryer and storage alcove.  For Admin/Crew areas, there is a station office, bunker gear room, beanery (kitchen) and dining room, weight/workout room, firefighter bunk rooms, toilet/shower rooms and laundry facilities.

As of 2015, E36 had 916 total responses with BLS response times of 4:38 minutes and ALS response times of 4:33 minutes.  Fires were 5:52 minutes.  Times have changed since then but no data is available at time of this posting.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Sources:  SFD (11/2014), Seattle.gov Archived Documents,Wikipedia

#PhinneyFire | Seattle, Washington

Seattle Fire crews (Stock Photo by (c) 2017 LR Swenson)

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

INCIDENT SUMMARY

Firefighters were dispatched @ 1850 hours PDT to a FIRE IN BUILDING call in the 4700 block of Phinney Avenue North in Seattle (Phinney neighborhood), Washington on Saturday evening.

COMMAND

Command first established “Phinney Command” at the time of arriving

FIRE TIMELINE

Fire operations would quickly take off, just like this incident.  Here is the timeline for this fire:

1856 | L8:  Assigned to the roof.

1857 | E18:  Laying a back-up line.     Command:  Floor 3 showing smoke from the roof, possibly into the roof. Asked unit to check for extension.

1858 | E21:  En route with pike poles.  Reported 3.5 stories and fire on Fire 3.  Fire coming from the ceiling.  Need pike poles. E17:  Assigned to put water on exterior side and using water from E9.  E16:  Assigned RIT.

1902 | Dispatch:  10 minutes on the incident clock.

1904 | Primary Search:  Completed on the fire floor (Floor 3).  All clear.

1905 | Command:  3-story wood frame, residential building turning white and multiple crews inside.  REHAB is at 47th & Phinney.

1906 | Command to Dispatch:  Blocking Phinney Avenue N.  Asked to notify King County Metro that street is blocked.

1909 | An unknown fire crew:  Smoke is pushing from the attic.

1910 | Equipment Request:  multiple 8 ft. Pike Poles are requested.

1912 | 20 minutes on the clock.

1913 | Report:  Fire knocked down.  1 crew is checking  extension.

1915 | Report:  Fire knocked down.  Marshal 5 has been requested.  Interior crew to wait to do any further knock down until FIU arrives on-scene.  E9: Decon line established.

1916 | E26:  Exiting out of the building.

1917 | Air9:  Arrived to fire.

1918 | B6:  Sufficient with needs.  No additional resources needed.

1919 | B6:  Secondary search completed.  All floors searched, Nothing found.

1922 | Back in Service:  Engine 6 and Ladder 6 were put back in service.

1924 | Dispatch to Command:  33 minutes on the timer.  Tap fire.

1927 | E16: RIT team reporting tap fire.  Will remain in Staging.

1928 | Fire crews found the electrical panel, shutting down power to the building.  North end of the fire building have been searched (secondary) on all floors are an all clear.

1930 | E9:  Engine water to be used and they can now remove the supply line.

DISPATCHED UNITS

The following units were dispatched to this fire:

A2 AIR9 B4 B6 DEP1 E16 E17 E18 E21 E6 E9 L6 L8 L9 M18 M44 REHAB1 SAFT2 STAF10 and MAR5 (FIU).

CLOSING COMMENTS

The fire was knocked down at 1913 hours and a tap fire reached at 1927 hours.  A Decon line was set up and all fire crews were sent through.

Firefighters worked diligently to get this stubborn fire suppression, under control and contained.  No civilian or firefighter injuries were reported.

Marshal 5 is still on site searching for the cause.  There was no preliminary cause released at the time of this post.

(c) 2017 The NW Fire Blog

 

While Seahawks Play, Firefighters Save Zoo Animals

Updated 6:50 PM PST

While the Seahawks Play…

As the Seattle Seahawks were ramping up for their game this evening, Seattle Firefighters were dispatched around 3:10 P.M. PST to a fire that broke out in the 600 block and N 59th Street.

A fire broke out inside the Nocturnal building at the Woodland Park Zoo and would quickly turn into a 2nd alarm bringing many fire resources city-wide.

Nocturnal Building Fire. (Credit: Seattle FD)

Units Dispatched

The following were dispatched to the “Fire in Building” call at 3:10 p.m.

  • Aid 2
  • Air9, Air240, Air26
  • Battalions 4 & 6
  • Comm Van
  • PIO
  • Deputy 1
  • Engines 8, 17, 18, 20, 21, 24, 31, 35, 36
  • Marshal5
  • Ladder Cos. 4, 6, 8, 9
  • Medics 1, 10, 16, 18, 28, 44
  • Safety2
  • Staff10
  • REHAB1
  • MRN (Marine) 1

Cause

Marshal5 (Fire Investigator) was also dispatched to the fire scene.  There is no known cause or preliminary information as to the area where the fire started.

Injuries

There was a report of two firefighters injured by a news media outlet but nothing official from the Fire Department sources we glean from.  There injuries and conditions are unknown at this time. We hope they are okay and are on the mend quickly.

No animals were said to be injured but were being moved from the fire building to a safer location.

(c) 2016 The #NWFireBlog

 

Structure Fire Puts Firefighters At Risk

INCIDENT SUMMARY

At 2025 Hours PDT, Seattle Firefighters were dispatched to a large concrete building with a solid concrete roof on Boren Avenue North and Thomas Street.

DISPATCHED UNITS

1st Alarm – A2, Air9, B5, B6, Dep1, E10, E17, E2, E22, E25, E6, L1, L10, L6, Medic1, Rehab1, Safety2, Safety10.

2nd Alarm – E16, E36, E41, E13, L7, L9, Air260, M44, M10 and the CommVan.

CONDITIONS

This building is a known building frequented by transients and were seen during this fire.  They were on the rooftop and had their faces covered.  Seattle Police (multiple Officers) were requested to respond as there were quite a few of the transients present.

After some time, it appears the transients were told to exit the building by Fire personnel but they were ignoring their pleas and commands, leaving the area of their own free will.  No one was reportedly arrested.

There was a Code 33 to all fire personnel on scene that this building is known to be booby-trapped, flooring issues, doors removed from the elevator shafts and human fecal matter.

FIRE ACTIVITY

The fire sounded like it was contained to one room.

No additional people were found in the structure and no injuries were reported by the “Boren Command”.

A Person Accountability Report or “PAR” was later conducted of all fire personnel.  All were accounted for.

Firefighters were dispatched around 2025 (8:25pm) hours this evening and the fire was reported as a tap fire at 2120 hours.

A Decon line was set-up to make sure firefighters cleaned off all of their gear before going back into service.

CAUSE

Marshal5, SFD’s Fire Investigator is on-scene investigating the cause of the fire.  There is currently no preliminary cause at the moment.

(c) 2016 The #NWFireBlog

MISSING | Seattle Firefighter Greatly Missed by Many

As some of you may or may not know, Seattle Firefighters along with the Seattle Police Department and fellow friends and Firefighters have been searching since last Thursday [December 10th] for missing Seattle Firefighter Joshua Milton, a 3-year veteran of the Department and entering into his first year into King County Medic 1 Program as a Paramedic student.

FF

Photo Courtesy: Seattle Police Department

Initial reports after he went missing a day or so,  reported by various sources said he had been found and working to bring FF Milton back home.  His car was found abandoned at Deception Pass – approximately 80 miles from Seattle, Washington.

Little information has been shed on the details surrounding his disappearance, so for the sake of hurting his family, we [The NW Fire Blog] have taken a back seat and seeing where we can help or lend support.  As of the time of this publication, this is still deemed as an active Missing Person case being investigated by the Seattle Police Department.

His Fire Family, immediate Family and Friends still are looking for him and if you know of any details on where he is located, you are urged to contact 9-1-1.

Many have been asking how they can help support his Family during this difficult time of year and there has been a Go Fund Me account setup for him.  Here is the information:  https://www.gofundme.com/4nf925y4.  We don’t know the person  directly, but we are led to believe this is a legitimate fundraising page for the family.

Please take a moment and give if you can. If not, please keep FF Milton’s family and his Fire brothers and sisters in your thoughts and prayers.  As you know, this has left a HUGE hole in the Fire Family and to those who know and loved him.

Editor’s Comments:  Generally speaking from experience, living with Depression or other underlying issues that can cause potential suicidal thoughts are embarrassing to admit, little alone share with someone that you are thinking about ending your life because it seems too hard or no one can really understand just comes with the territory of the burden they are carrying.  It becomes your reality and something that you hide on a daily basis.

I can attest to this state-of-mind when I was began experiencing suicidal thoughts at the age of five years old from a very bad childhood into my adulthood at age 21. Yes, that is the truth and has been a worthy cause for me to try to help at least one person, then I know I am making a difference in someone’s life to keep on living.

Be a good listener and to issues that he/she may be going through. Don’t criticize or be judgmental as it could easily send the person over the ability to handle the stress impeding your opportunities of assisting them.  Always check in with them to see how they are doing and let them know they are important.

Did you all go through a traumatic call? Talk it out with each other or let your Chaplain know you need to chat about it.  It is better in so many ways to let off the “steam” then holding all those emotions deep down inside until the burden is way too heavy to carry anymore.  There are many resources including @safecallnow, a 24 hour/7 day/365 confidential line.  Many of those who reach out to are great listeners, confidential, compassionate and know what you are going through. Some of them have gone through very bad situations.   Give them a call @ 206-459-3020.

I don’t know about SFD Firefighter Milton’s situation or if he was dealing with many personal issues, but I can tell you from experience that it is very important to talk things out with one another and get a feel for what they are going through. Being a good listener and helping them through whatever it is that they are going through is the best way to offer assistance.  If you feel it is out of your scope, please talk to a Professional or Chaplain for recommendations.

Be Safe Friends and remember, we care a lot about every single one of you all.

– Lisa Swenson, Editor of The NW Fire Blog [@nwfireblog – Twitter]