Exterior Shed Fire Prompts SFD Full Fire Response

Incident Summary

An exterior shed fire ignited from an unknown cause in the backyard of a home in the 9400 block of 18th Avenue SW in Seattle, Washington on Sunday, January 19, 2020.

Due to the fire, a power line was downed.  The power company was requested to respond to the fire ground.

Resources

Seattle Fire units A14 AIR10 B5 B7 DEP1 E26 E27 E32 E36 E37 L1 L11 M32 M44 MAR5 R1 REHAB1 SAFT2 STAF10 and E11.

Stock Photo

Stock Photo (c) NW Fire Blog

Seattle City Light power crews.

Fire Operations

Engine 11 arrived as first due apparatus to a working fire of a 20×20 exterior shed in the backyard of a home.  They immediately pulled a pre-connect and designated the incident as “18th Avenue SW Command”. (2114 PST)

Battalion asked if the response could be reduced. (2116). She arrived shortly there after. (2119)

Engine 26 provided water for Engine 11. Engine continued to run on tank water and switched over. During the fire operation, they needed to hook up to a secondary hydrant for a water supply.

Water was put on the fire on the Charlie side. The fire response was reduced to a 2. 1&1 which is two engines, a ladder company and a Battalion Chief.   Engines 11 and 37, Ladder 11 and Battalion 2 remained on-scene. (2120-2121)

It was reported that this could be a possible hoarder situation, which from experience we know to be dangerous to occupants and to firefighters.  The interior of the basement and floor one of the nearby residence also was checked.  There were no extension, smoke or damage to the home, but also in the same alleged condition.

The fire was tapped several minutes later. (2133)

Cause

A Seattle Fire Investigator, Marshal 5 was dispatched to this call and is currently on-scene investigating the cause.   There is no preliminary cause at the time of this post.

Injuries

No reports of injuries to the occupant or firefighters have occurred.

Red Cross was requested for one displaced occupant. (2155)

(c) 2020 NW Fire Blog – Posted 1/19/2020 @ 2155 hours PST

Four Lives Remembered: The Seattle Fire Four

THE DIRTY DEED

Today, we remember the four lives that were stolen from us back on January 5, 1995, when an arson fire set by Martin Pang, the son of the owners of the Mary Pang Chinese Food Company in hopes of collecting a  large insurance sum of money.

Credit | US Fire Administration 

A man described by his ex-wifes and former girlfriends, say his threats of violence came in the form of setting fires and they reported his intentions to the Seattle Police and Fire Departments prior to the deadly incident.

The determined cause of the fire was ruled as arson and Martin Pang, the son was charged.  He would flee to Brazil knowing they have no extridite policy.  After three years of diplomatic delays, he would come back to the United States and make a plea deal instead of fighting to be extridited.

In the end, he was charged with 35 years but would only serve 20 years for “good behavior”.  Challenges to allow him to be released sooner than his sentence, all efforts failed and angered many.

CALL DETAILS

At 1902 hours, Seattle Fire Dispatch initially received a 9-1-1 call from a reporting party, a band member who occupied one of the rooms within an adjacent building to the Mary Pang Chinese Food Company warehouse.  They reported smoke seeping into their practice room.

Image

Courtesy | Pierce Co Firefighters

A 1st alarm or full response, as it is known today, was dispatched by the Seattle Fire Alarm Center (FAC).  Five engines, two ladder trucks, one aid unit (BLS), one Medic unit (ALS), Air Support and two Command Staff were immediately deployed at 1903 PST.

They would respond to the 800 block of 7th Avenue in Seattle, Washington on January 5, 1995.  This was known as the Mary Pang Chinese Food warehouse, a food-processing plant that prepared  pre-made food that was distributed to area grocery stores.

This building had been operating successfully in this location for 20 years prior to this incident.  It was located in the busy portion of the International District of Seattle and only a few blocks from the former Kingdome.

FIRE OPERATIONS

First due units reported a well-involved building fire and pulled a pre-connect to a nearby hydrant.  Some reported fire at the rear of the structure and from a small shed, this was later identified as an employee lunchroom that had been “added on” to the structure.  One of the crews initiated a forcible entry, then were tasked with raising ground ladders to proceed with Roof Operations and to cut a hole in the roof for vertical ventilation.

Fire crews were working on opposite sides of the building.   Once inside, they found a few spot fires and immediately knocked them down.  These were mostly near the ground floor level. Crews were working in adverse conditions that included zero visibility, having to move around equipment and stored materials blindly and very slowly.  Some interior temps were reported hot enough to keep them in crouched positions but they did not distinguish as being abnormal.

Fire in some parts of the building were cool, while crews found a small fire burning in the basement of the building.  Initials reports indicate they thought there were only two floors and were unaware of a basement in this building.

At some point during fire operations, the building was said to have rumbled and flames erupted from the basement as the floor began to collapse.  An unanticipated flaw (one of many key issues raised by the Fire Investigative report) in the structure, caused the “pony wall” to fail which dropped the ends of the floor joists and sending sections of wood and concrete floor down into the basement.   Flames then began to spread across the underside of the roof and what was on  the ground floor began to catch on fire in a rapid flashover sequence.

Two Fire Lieutenants and two Firefighters also disappeared into the fire, while seven  firefighters and one Lieutenant  bailed out of windows and doors suffering burns to their necks, ears, wrists and one hand.  No one on the outside knew what was happening on the inside.

Hot and heavy smoke began billowing out of doors and through a small hole in the roof where they ventialated the smoke.  Smoking Firefighters’ PPE (Firefighters protection personal equipment) were visible as those on the outside watched the rapid events unfolding before their eyes.

1st Alarm units were aware of the arson threat but they were unaware of the multiple rennovations done on this building over its 85-year history.  There were several crucial failures on this day.

THE WORST NIGHTMARE EVER

Abandon the Building tones were broadcasted over radio transmissions. The FAC notifified command that they received an emergency activation alert.  It was determined that it was not coming from one but two firefighter radios.   Later learned, four firefighters were found to be missing.

Image

Credit | FEMA

Search-and-rescue missions were immediately coordinated by crews to look for the missing four and tracking their last-known-locations. Rescue efforts continued but then the risk to the rescuers would be far greater to them.

All efforts were ceased due to the amount of time missing and extreme risk to rescuers themselves.  This would weigh on many firefighters then, now and most likely, in the future.

Firefighters were forced to abandon the building and return to firefighting suppression efforts, including using masterstreams to control the fire.

All four firefighters were rescued from the demolished building but it would take a total of three sombering days.

LESSONS LEARNED

A lot has changed within the City of Seattle and around the country, since this incident happened in 1995, but we can tell you that this event and what transpired still affects firefighters, both active and retired to this day.  It brings tears to many and anger to others as they say this could have been easily prevented.

Since, this date – a lot has happened in the wake of this terrible tragedy.

  • Survivors (Firefighters Families) were awarded $450,000 – $5.6 Million in damage lawsuits against the City of Seattle. SFD, 75% liable. Martin Pang, 25% liable.
  • Seattle Fire has made great strides to changing their accountability, risk-management, pre-fire planning, 360* size ups of their buildings, progress reports to name just a few.

THE SEATTLE FIRE FOUR  – Through the Eyes of the World

We would like to dedicate this post to the Seattle Fire Four, who lost their lives on this day in 1995.  We will continue to remember your accomplishments in the living, the impacts you had on your communities and the Legacies you left us all to behold.

Today, we remember those Lost and their Legacies left behind.  It is what we can only do in the present.

Image

Credit | Seattle Fire/IAFF Local 27

SEATTLE FIRE DEATHS – Always Remember, Never Forgotten

1891 | Firefighter Herman Larson.

1899 | Fire Engineer Charles E Brabon.

1910 | Captain JN Longfellow.

1914 | Firefighter Patrick Cooper.

1917 | Battalion Chief Fred G. Gilham and Firefighter Ole G. Rust.

1920 | Firefighter Charles F. Lacasse.

1923 | Captain Horace E. Roberts.

1924 | Firefighter William E. Shuberg.

1925 | Firefighter Cecil McKenzie.

1927 | Firefighter Darwin T. Lund.

1928 | Firefighter Charles E. Wheeler.

1937 | Fire Captain Albert S. Wolpert.

1938 | Firefighter Theodore R. Cousland.

1943 | Firefighter Luther D. Bonner.

1945 | Captain Andrew G. Beattie.

1947 | Firefighter Fred O. Larson.

1949 | Firefighters Jack W. McGee and Glen S. Murphy.

1957 | Firefighter James Willey.

1964 | Firefighter John F. Herron.

1966 | Captain Harold W. Webb.

1968 | Firefighter Henry C. Gronnerud.

1976 | Firefighter Gerald Miller.

1983 | Firefighter Lisa J. LOng.

1984 | Firefighter Mary R. Mathews.

1987 | Firefighter Robert d. Earhart.

1989  | Lieutenant Mathew W. Johnson.

1991 | Firefighter Donald L. Perry.

1995 | Firefighters James T. Brown and Randall R. Terlicker. Lieutenants Walter D. Kilgore and Gregory A. Shoemaker.

1996 | Firefighter Gary V. Medica.

2004 | Deputy Chief Gerald N. Moberg.

2005 | Firefighter Nathaniel Ford.

2008 | Firefighter Timothy J. Heelan and Battalion Chief James H. Scragg.

2009 | Battalion Chief David H. Jacobs and Firefighter Stephen Lohr.

2010 | Deputy Chief Jesse F. Youngs.

2011 | Firefighter Jeffrey Brit.

2013 | Firefighter Jess Hernandez.

2014 | Firefighters Keith I. Johnson and Wallace F. Goulet.

2015 | Firefighter Joshua Milton.

2016 | Firefighters Tristan Smith, Scott Steed and Captain Craig Aman.

2018 | Firefighter Marvin Larry.

Sources:  FEMA/Homeland Security, Seattle Fire, IAFF Local 27, Social Media, news media.

(c) 2020 NW Fire Blog – 1/5/2020 @ 1835 hours PST

 

Seattle Feels Pain of Protests | 2

Seattle Police are being faced with protesters throwing bottles and rocks at their Officers.  Those that were the culprits have been arrested and taken to jail.

Several suspects were seen with sticks in hand.  Those who had damaged patrol cars were being investigated and searched for by police to be arrested.

After protesters began dissipating around 1330 hours, traffic and bus routes were being allowed to resume as normal. Officers demobilzed from the downtown area and recalled to their respective service areas.

They are still continuing to monitor areas as needed.

(c) 2020 NW Fire Blog – Updated 1500 hours PST

 

#SeattlePolice #SeattlePD #Demonstrations

(c) 2020 NW Fire Blog – Updated 1/5/2020 – 1235 PST

Seattle Police Officers Heavily Secure City Hall Plaza | 1

Seattle Police released a presser via Twitter late this morning that they would be providing public safety and traffic management services to two separate demonstrations, one with a permit to City Hall Plaza and one without.

As the demonstrations began to heat up, the second group began to occupy City Hall Plaza and refused to move out.  After a short time, they finally were dispelled from the area, enabling the permitted first group to move-into the area.

Image

Credit | @SeattlePD

Sounded like someone was involved in an altercation with Officers and claimed he was hurt. Seattle Fire was called to respond to the area.    No Officers were hurt and the situation was quickly brought under control.

While Officers were clearing the building, they found a potential deadly weapon left behind.  In looking at this photo, you can see what looks like cloth over the board with bolts protruding.

Image

Credit | @SeattlePD

If you look more closer, the above two photos relate to the one down below.  Officers are taking all precautions to protect the public and all fellow Law Enforcement.   They will arrest anyone who causes harm against any and all persons.

Image

Seattle believes in free speech, but to cause bodily harm or property destruction will not be tolerated and its Police forces will attempt to stop any mayhem from occurring.

Seattle Police are using bicycles, fencing and other barriers to allow both groups to demonstrate peacefully.

This is an on-going protest.

#SeattlePolice #SeattlePD #Demonstrations

(c) 2020 NW Fire Blog – Updated 1/5/2020 – 1235 PST

Quick Egress Saves Seattle Home on Saturday Night

North Seattle, Washington | A kitchen fire ignited in a home located in the 9000 block of 8th Avenue NE in the Maple Leaf neighborhood near Green Lake on Saturday evening.

The house fire prompted Seattle Fire units A25, AIR10, B4, B6, DEP1, E16, E17, E21, E22, E31, L5, L8, L9, M17, M44, MAR5, REHAB1, SAFT2 and STAF10 dispatched at 2127 hours PDT.

Due to the immediate egress by firefighters, which was about ten minutes on the incident timer – they brought the fire quickly under control then tapped it shortly thereafter.

The home is currently not for sale is said to be worth around $800,000.  Seattle Fire’s Investigator (Mar5) had arrived on-scene.   There was no known cause at the time of this post or a preliminary amount of cost to the structure.

There were no injuries to firefighters and the Fire Department confirmed there were no occupants home at the time the fire broke out

(c) 2019 NW Fire Blog – Updated on Saturday, August 17, 2019 @ 2225 hours PDT

MCI | Crane Topples On To Cars Below in Seattle | 1

SEATTLE, Wa.  |  A crane on the top of a building toppled on to several cars below in the area of Fairview Avenue North and Mercer Street on  Saturday afternoon, April 27, 2019.

Toppled crane | Credit: SDOT

INCIDENT SUMMARY

Seattle Fire and Police were dispatched to the area as a Mass Casualty Incident or MCI as it is more commonly called.  Seattle Fire’s CAD system showed the incident as a heavy rescue – major.

‘”The incident at Fairview Ave N and involved a crane that fell into traffic. 5 cars were crushed. There are a total of 4 fatalities, and 3 injured patients that have been transferred to the hospital.”

– Seattle Fire Department PIO

RESOURCES

Fire Units

At 1527 hours or 3:27 pm, West Coast time, Seattle Fire resources included:

Air Units 10 and 240-260.

Battalions 2, 5, 4 and 6.

Deputy 1, Safety 2, Staff 10, PIO and Chaplain 7. MCI 1.

Aid Units 2, 5, 14 and 25.  Medics 1, 10, 17, 18 and 44 (Supervisor).

Engines 2, 5, 8, 9,  17,  20, 21, 22, 25 and 34.

Ladders 1, 4,  6, 9 and 10.

Heavy Rescue 1.

Majority of fire resources were starting to go back into service around 1700 hours PDT, while others were still assigned to the MCI Incident.

Seattle Police

WSDOT 

Several Incident Response Team personnel were dispatched to shutdown the Mercer Street on/off ramp off of I-5.  (WSDOT)

TRAFFIC ALERTS

Mercer Street

All WB and EB lanes closed at Mercer St at Fairview Ave. Fallen crane on west side of Fairview Ave N and Mercer St intersection. (SDOT 1533 PDT, Alert expected to expire 2359 PDT)

Please avoid travelling near Fairview Avenue and Mercer Street. Roads are closed while emergency personnel respond to a fallen construction crane. Expect and plan for traffic impacts in the surrounding areas. PIO Michaud en route to the scene. (Seattle Police)

SR99

NB | On the SR 99 northbound off-ramp to Mercer St (MP 33) there is a disabled vehicle partially blocking the ramp. (WSDOT 1635 hours PDT)

I-5 

SB | On I-5 southbound at Anderson Rd (MP 225) there is a collision blocking the right lane. The Incident Response Team and the State Patrol have arrived on the scene. (WSDOT 1619 PDT)

NB | Update 4:09 PM : On the I-5 northbound off-ramp to Mercer St (MP 166) there is an incident blocking the ramp and the left general purpose lane. Medical Aid, Fire Assistance, the Incident Response Team, and Seattle Police have arrived on the scene.  (WSDOT 1610 PDT)

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS

  • Construction crane toppled from top of multi-story building.
  • Crane fell atop of multiple number of cars, killing several people.
  • Heavy equipment was seen laying across several lanes of traffic.
  • All lanes blocked.
  • 4 people killed, 3 others injured.

CAUSE

The cause of today’s accident is unknown but we will update as soon as investigators determine it.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Thank you for reading this post and following our Blog.  We wish all of you safety wherever you are, day or night, always.

You can follow us here on our “Official” Blog, on Twitter (@nwfireblog) and on our Instagram account.

(c) 2019 NW FIRE BLOG – Updated 4/27/2019 @ 1715 Hours PDT

Elderly Man Shoots Man on Metro Transit Bus

Seattle, WA. | An 88-year old male shot a 51-year old man on a King County Metro transit bus on Saturday, January 26, 2019, around 1115 hours PST this morning, Seattle Police say.  It appears there was some kind of disturbance between the two individuals on a bus located on 4th Avenue South and South Walker in Seattle.

Eyewitness Accounts

Eyewitnesses reported seeing the younger man push the older gentleman as he attempted to board the bus, prompting the elderly man to present a gun and shoot the other man.  The older man did fall striking his head on the stairwell as he attempted to exit the bus.

Suspects Detained

Both were held by Seattle Police until Seattle Fire arrived to take both persons to Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center.

Police Looking for Tips

Detectives were dispatched to the crime scene and are currently investigating.  The Seattle Police Violent Crimes unit is looking for anyone who has information to aid them with their ongoing case to contact them at 206-233-5000.

Suspects Conditions

Both injuries are considered to be of serious in nature.

Injuries

No other passengers on the bus were injured.

Social Media

We are using the following hashtags for this post:  #SeattleShooting #MetroBusShooting #Seattle #Washington #CrimeNews2019

We can also be found on Twitter & Facebook at  @nwfireblog.

(c) 2019 NW FIRE BLOG

Seattle Fights Large Barge Fire

SEATTLE, Wash. – On Tuesday, June 26, 2018, Firefighters were dispatched to a fully engulfed scrapped car barge fire moored at the Seattle and Iron Metal Corp. dock. The commercial fire was located in the 600 block of South Myrtle Street in the Georgetown area.

SIT REP

The fire incident was quickly elevated to a 2-Alarm fire response bringing more Chiefs, personnel, equipment and more fire boats.

Image may contain: outdoor

Photo Credit | David Sonsteng (Written permission granted)

RESOURCES

The following Seattle fire resources were dispatched immediately, which they quickly engaged the fire.

MRN1, FRB5, A14, E28, L3, E27, L1, L11, SAFT2, STAF10, DEP1, R1, FIREBOAT, AIR10, FRB4, A2, M1, E11, L7, B5, E6, A10, E36, REHAB1, E13, M28, PTRL4, B7, B5, MAR5, PIO, E32, E10.

INCIDENT COOPERATORS

Seattle Fire personnel.

City of Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and Office staff.

Image may contain: sky, ocean, outdoor and water

Photo Credit | David Sonsteng (Written permission granted)

Seattle SPU arrived to the fire scene with their main focus on assessing the Duwamish River.

The Department of Ecology stated they observed no oil sheen and did not observe distressed wildlife on the Duwamish River on Wednesday morning, June 27, 2018.  They did say there was a small amount of firefighting foam at the tide line.  The barge is boomed as a precaution.

Barge moored along river bank, crane in background, orange boom in foreground.

Photo Credit | WA Dept. of Ecology

CAUSE

Fire Investigators have ruled the cause as accidental and with damages at $1,000,000.

INJURIES

Two firefighters were reported to have been injured after suffering minor injuries and were treated at a nearby unnamed (most likely Harborview Medical Center) hospital.

Image may contain: sky, outdoor and water

Photo Credit | David Sonsteng (Written permission granted)

SOCIAL MEDIA

Social Media became ablaze with barge fire photos being posted all over the Twitter and Facebook.

Photos portrayed a huge black smoke column seen from areas such as Capitol Hill, West Seattle, South Seattle, seen on 1st Avenue South bridge, from north of the Seattle Boeing plant, Seatac Airport, Magnolia and by others on the outskirts of this large City.

If you are seeing smoke to the East (via from West Seattle).  It is a barge on fire with metal and propane on the Duwamish River.”

Seattle Fire Department says the fire is mostly out and that they train for these types of large fire incidents.” – SFD Presser

We are aware of the large barge fire. We are monitoring the situation and will respond as needed.” – USCG Pacific Northwest

ABOUT DAVID SONSTENG, PHOTOGRAPHER

Want more great photos?  Check out David Sonsteng, Photographer and Owner of DJ Sonsteng Photography on his Facebook Page @djsonstengphotography or on Instagram at @d.j.sonsteng.photography.

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog – Updated at 0540 PDT

Fire History Remembered: Seattle Fire’s Station #36

Seattle, Washington | Seattle Fire Department’s rich fire history has been recorded from year-to-year that dates back to July 6, 1876, when it was an all-volunteer company named Seattle Engine Company No. 1. It was organized by a group of citizens convinced of their own growing town’s need for a dedicated fire-suppression organization. Various fire companies were visible in providing private services until 1883 when the City Charter was amended to create and fund equipment but not staff for a centralized Fire Department.

Seattle Fire’s first Fire Chief was Gardner Kellogg of the new established volunteer organization in 1889 and acting Fire Marshal in 1901.  The volunteer organization survived into the late 1880’s, even during the Great Seattle Fire of 1889 which destroyed 30 city blocks and caused $12-$16 Million in damages.  Soon after, the City acknowledged the part-time force did not have enough fire-suppression resources to meet their expanding need for fire protection and found itself the recipients of heavy pressure from the insurance industry and its own citizens.  Ordinance No. 1212 in 1889 was passed by the Council which converted Seattle’s seven volunteer companies into a paid, professional of 32 men and into five fire districts.

Item No. 2688, West Seattle Fire Station No. 36, 23rd Avenue and Spokane Street, Seattle Fire Department Central Files, Record Series 2613-07. Seattle Municipal Archives. (1927)

Decades would soon pass after the creation of the professional Seattle Fire Department bringing a rapid increase in size and resources, as well as a higher rise in its resident population.  In 1890, the population was recorded at 42,000 and showing a massive increase to 237,000 by 1910.  In 1891, many iconic developments occurred with its maritime fire unit inception and with the deployment of their fire boat Snoqualmie in 1891, horse-drawn resources transitioned over to motorized fire engines in 1924 and development of firefighter-staffed emergency response aid cars were implemented during the 1930’s.  They were also members of the historic founding of the IAFF in 1918 and became Charter members of their Department’s union Local 27, one 218 in the organization.

The Seattle Fire Department has moved away from just providing fire-suppression efforts as it did in its earlier days to critical services such as, building inspections, fire code enforcement, tactical rescues and public education.  It is a fire-based two-tier response system providing pre-hospital BLS and ALS support services. There are six paramedic provider programs with SFD operating Seattle Medic One.  The Department protects both lives and properties of their 634,535 residents and 768,000 during the day in a 83.9 square mile area including 193 miles (53 miles of tidal waters).  It is listed at #22 on the Cities with populations of 100,000 and greater).

The Fire Department presents itself with 981 uniformed fire personnel with 207 on-duty strength, 38 Department Chiefs, 981 EMTs, 76 Paramedics and 84 non-uniformed (civilian) personnel.  Additionally, There are 34 Fire Stations (Medic One HQ at Harborview Medical Center).  There are 33 fire engines including on-duty Fire Boat, 12 Ladder Trucks, 4 Aid Units (BLS), 2 Air Trucks, 4 Fire Boats and 2 Hose Wagons.

Seattle Fire’s Station #36 is located at 3600 23rd Avenue SW, Seattle.  This photo was taken in 1927.  Presently, the station houses one engine company (E36), the department’s tunnel rescue unit and a marine specialty unit which serves the south end and in the Harbor Island/Delridge neighborhood community.

It was one of 32 neighborhood fire stations that was upgraded, renovated or replaced through the fire Facilities and Emergency Response Program which was approved by Seattle voters in 2003.  This facility built-in 1971 was in general fair condition but required some seismic retrofits to meet current earthquake safety standards.  Remodeling to enhance its operations was also part of the $1.7 million project.

IMG_0090

Photo Credit: Seattle Fire Department (2014)

Some of the great station’s features are:  bay space for two fire apparatus including the marine specialty unit, a decon/clean room, maintenance work area and battery charging alcove, storage for major disaster supplies and EMS equipment and hose dryer and storage alcove.  For Admin/Crew areas, there is a station office, bunker gear room, beanery (kitchen) and dining room, weight/workout room, firefighter bunk rooms, toilet/shower rooms and laundry facilities.

As of 2015, E36 had 916 total responses with BLS response times of 4:38 minutes and ALS response times of 4:33 minutes.  Fires were 5:52 minutes.  Times have changed since then but no data is available at time of this posting.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Sources:  SFD (11/2014), Seattle.gov Archived Documents,Wikipedia

Public Safety News | Overnight Trending Stories

United States | News from around the Nation of what is Trending and information gleaned from various sources.

TEXAS MASSACRE.  Around 1120 am a gunman opened fire upon a church service in progress at the 1st Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, TX killing 26 people and injuring scores more.  The shooter was approached by a neighbor next to the church and began shooting back at him.  The shooter is said to be deceased from an unknown bullet used by either the killer or the neighbor.  This is said to be the worst mass shooting in all of Texas history.

A FALLEN HERO.  Fallen Hillsboro FD Firefighter Ryan Grimaldi was out on a hunting trip when a tree fell on him.  He passed away from his injuries.  He was well-respected and loved in his community.  His fellow firefighters and Fire Agency brought him home yesterday.  Several hundreds were seen in his procession as they headed to their destination.

HOMELESSNESS GROWING ON WEST COAST.   How is this Public Safety related?  It has to do with Officer and 1st Responder safety when they are responding to aid and fire calls inside the camps.  There have been often too many dangers where Seattle Police have to provide an escort to Firefighters because of the looming problems with some homeless people.  KOMO News put out an article about the homeless population soaring on the West Coast and how cities are struggling to cope.

HIGHRISE FIRE IN THE BRONX, NY.   A fire broke out on the top floors of a multi-dwelling highrise where fire was seen from different angles shooting through the roof. The FDNY responded to the fire burning on the top floors and inside the cockloft that was located at 4769 White Plains Road.  Command called out to their firefighters to use caution as this building had been cited before for doing illegal rennovations on the top floors.  The 3-alarm fire was ruled accidental due to electrical building wires that caught fire.  (Photo Credit:  FDNY)

View image on Twitter

SECOND SHOOTING IN ONE DAY.  Another church shooting occurred on Sunday, November 5 and one that is not being covered as much as the large mass shooting in Texas.  An estranged wife and her boyfriend were leaving the St . Alphonsus Catholic Church in Fremont, California when they were gunned down by her soon-to-be-husband killing them both. They were in the middle of a divorce. He was later found in his vehicle deceased of self-inflicted wounds.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog