#KnobHillFire Spreads To Public Lands | 1

INCIDENT SUMMARY

A wildfire that ignited on private land has spread on to public lands of the Coronado National Forest on the western side of the Dragoon Mountains by Cochise Stronghold.   It is about 15 miles east of St. David, Arizona.

FIRE STATUS

The fire started from an unknown cause on Saturday, February 10, 2018, and has reportedly already scorched 2,896 acres of dry grass and brush.   Fire behavior is moderate, creeping and backing.

Flight over Knob hill

Photo Credit: USFS

Firefighters have successfully reached a 15% containment status.

RESOURCES

About 167 firefighters are currently in full fire suppression on the fire line under an a Type 3 Incident Command.

The Cochise county Sheriff’s Office has set-up a hard closure on the west side of the dragoon Mountains and was due to be lifted at 1700 hours on Sunday.  Deputies will continue to close off the eastern area of the mountainside.

FIRE WEATHER

A Red Flag warning is in effect as of Monday, February 12th from 1200 hours to 1900 hours for high winds and low RH.  Conditions are warm and dry with large amounts of dried brush causing to be easily ignited.

SOCIAL MEDIA

We are using #KnobHillFire #AZwildfire hashtags for this incident.

(c) 2018 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Apparatus

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

# # #

APPARATUS

A term usually used by firefighters describing a department vehicle
(i.e. fire engine).

# # #

A

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressant from the air over the fire ground.

Air tanker on the Thomas Fire in December 2017 (Credit: VCFD_PIO)

Alpha Type 1 Engine:  A vehicle with a 1000 GPM and a 400 gallon tank, staffed with 4 personnel.

B

Bambi Bucket:  A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression.

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

C

Command Staff:  The Command Staff consists of the Information Officer, Safety Officer and Liasion Officer.  They report directly to the Incident Command and may have Assistants.

D

Drip Torch:  Hand-held device for igniting fires by dripping flaming liquid fuel on the materials to be burned; consists of a fuel fount, burner arm, and igniter.  Fuel used is generally a mixture of diesel and gasoline.”

The Drip Torch “tool” (Credit: Dept of Interior Wildfire)

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Command Staff

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

# # #

COMMAND STAFF

The Command Staff consists of the Information Officer, Safety Officer and Liasion Officer.  They report directly to the Incident Command and may have Assistants.

# # #

A

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressant from the air over the fire ground.

Air tanker on the Thomas Fire in December 2017 (Credit: VCFD_PIO)

Alpha Type 1 Engine:  A vehicle with a 1000 GPM and a 400 gallon tank, staffed with 4 personnel.

B

Bambi Bucket:  A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression.

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

D

Drip Torch:  Hand-held device for igniting fires by dripping flaming liquid fuel on the materials to be burned; consists of a fuel fount, burner arm, and igniter.  Fuel used is generally a mixture of diesel and gasoline.”

The Drip Torch “tool” (Credit: Dept of Interior Wildfire)

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

On The Eleventh Day of Christmas …..

The (Wild)Fire Season gave to thee…..

11 Wildland Firefighters

10 Strike Teams Responding…

9 Copters Dropping…   

8 Water Tenders Supplying…

7 Fire Logistics Dispatchers Ordering…

6 Helitack Crews Rappelling…

5 I M T ‘ s….

4 Bulldozers Dozing…

3 Incident Command Posts….

2 Fire Chasers….

And A  Serious Fire Blogger….

(c) 2017 The NW Fire Blog – Written / Photography Content. Also written by (Becki Coates)

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Drip Torch

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

# # #

DRIP TORCH

“Hand-held device for igniting fires by dripping flaming liquid fuel on the materials to be burned; consists of a fuel fount, burner arm, and igniter.  Fuel used is generally a mixture of diesel and gasoline.”

The Drip Torch “tool” (Credit: Dept of Interior Wildfire)

# # #

A

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressant from the air over the fire ground.

Air tanker on the Thomas Fire in December 2017 (Credit: VCFD_PIO)

Alpha Type 1 Engine:  A vehicle with a 1000 GPM and a 400 gallon tank, staffed with 4 personnel.

B

Bambi Bucket:  A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression.

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

On The Tenth Day of Christmas …..

The (Wild)Fire Season gave to thee…..

10 Strike Teams Responding…

9 Copters Dropping…   

8 Water Tenders Supplying…

7 Fire Logistics Dispatchers Ordering…

6 Helitack Crews Rappelling…

5 I M T ‘ s….

4 Bulldozers Dozing…

3 Incident Command Posts….

2 Fire Chasers….

And A  Serious Fire Blogger….

(c) 2017 The NW Fire Blog – Written / Photography Content. Also written by (Becki Coates)

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Hand Line

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

# # #

HANDLINE

A fireline built with hand tools.

# # #

A

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.

Air tanker on the Thomas Fire in December 2017 (Credit: VCFD_PIO)

Alpha Type 1 Engine:  A vehicle with a 1000 GPM and a 400 gallon tank, staffed with 4 personnel.

B

Bambi Bucket:  A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression.

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Alpha Type 1 Engine

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Alpha Type 1 Engine

An Alpha Type 1 Engine is a vehicle with a 1000 GPM and a 400 gallon tank, staffed with 4 personnel.

# # #

A

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground. 

B

Bambi Bucket:  A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression. 

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Bambi Bucket

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Bambi Bucket

A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression. (Source: NWCG)

(Credit:  (c) 2017 NW Fire Blog)

# #

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.  

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Air Attack

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Air Attack

An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

# #

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.  

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

Source:  USDA US Forest Service

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog