Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Alpha Type 1 Engine

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Alpha Type 1 Engine

An Alpha Type 1 Engine is a vehicle with a 1000 GPM and a 400 gallon tank, staffed with 4 personnel.

# # #

A

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground. 

B

Bambi Bucket:  A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression. 

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Bambi Bucket

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Bambi Bucket

A collapsible bucket slung underneath a helicopter. Used to dip water from a variety of sources for fire suppression. (Source: NWCG)

(Credit:  (c) 2017 NW Fire Blog)

# #

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Attack:  An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.  

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Air Attack

Fire terminology is used throughout the Fire Service and we thought we’d get you all up to speed with each word and their definition.  See that we are missing one on the list? Please let us know! 

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Air Attack

An Air Attack or AA is a light command aircraft (usually an airplane or helicopter) that directs all air resources over a fire which is normally a pilot or a Battalion Chief.

# #

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.  

Blow-up:   A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

Source:  USDA US Forest Service

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Blow-up

Fire Terminology has a long list of definitions and we are ready to break it down for you each day.  As we compile our list, you are welcome to comment on our post and we will add them as we go.  Ready?  Here we go in 3-2-1. Go.

How well do you know your Fire Terminology?

Blow-up

“A sudden increase in fire intensity or rate of spread strong enough to  prevent direct control or to upset control plans. Blow-ups are often accompanied by violent convection and may  have other characteristics of a fire storm.”

This photo was taken by Ventura County FD on December 4, 2017 of the Thomas Fire.  This could easily be considered as a firestorm as the fire originally was deemed at 500 acres but has consumed everything in its path with a current standing at 50,500 acres with a 0% containment status.  That, my friends is what we call a “firestorm” on steroids.

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Air Tanker:  An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.  

Source:  USDA US Forest Service

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Air Tanker

Fire Terminology has a long list of definitions and we are ready to break it down for you each day.  As we compile our list, you are welcome to comment on our post and we will add them as we go.  Ready?  Here we go in 3-2-1. Go.

Air Tanker

One of Coulson’s Air Tankers during the Rimrock Fire in Washington State. (c) NW Fire Blog

An air tanker is a fixed-wing aircraft equipped to drop fire retardants and suppressants from the air over the fire ground.  We know many of you either are pilots of these big flying machines or have reaped the benefits from their flyover helping you and your crews stop the wildfire(s) from spreading further, even putting them out.

 

Aerial Fuels:   Live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Source:  USDA US Forest Service

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

Fire Terminology | How Well Do You Know It? | Aerial Fuels

Fire Terminology has a long list of definitions and we are ready to break it down for you each day.  As we compile our list, you are welcome to comment on our post and we will add them as we go.  Ready?  Here we go in 3-2-1. Go.

Aerial Fuels

Aerial Fuels are all live and dead vegetation in the forest canopy or above surface fuels, including tree branches, twigs, cones, snags, moss and high brush.

Source:  USDA US Forest Service

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

#ThrowBackThursday | Sutherland Canyon Fire

THROWBACK THURSDAY | This new post title is all about stepping back in time and viewing some of the 2017 Fire Season’s wildfires that scorched many of our NW landscapes and making its own path of destruction.  Today’s fire is the Sutherand Canyon Fires that burned in and near Wenatchee, Washington State in June of this year.

170628 Sutherland Canyon Fire

Sutherland Canyon Fire is showing its fierce side. Photo taken on June 28, 2017. (Credit: Richard Parrish/BLM)

INCIDENT SUMMARY

The Sutherland Canyon Fire ignited on June 26, 2017, around midnight on a Monday from lightning that touched the area causing multiple grass fires.  The fires were located about 9-20 miles south Wenatchee in the counties of Chelan, Grant and Douglas.

The fires were burning on land owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WA DNR) and private lands.  The fire was also said to have destroyed critical sage and grouse habitat.

MULTIPLE FIRES IGNITED.

ALCOA FIRE

June 26, 2017.   Alcoa Hwy near Junction Ridge started on June 26, 2017.  100 firefighters assigned. Grass, brushy fuels.  500 acres. 0% contained. Level 2  evacuations in process. Limited updates.

SUTHERLAND CANYON FIRES

170701 Sutherland Canyon Fire

June 27, 2017.  The Sutherland Canyon Fires was located 8 miles SE of Wenatchee and had 75 personnel assigned.  3,000 acres burned. This was made up of five smaller fires collectively under this single wildfire name. Level 2 evacuation levels were in effect.

June 28, 2017.  No update.

170701 Sutherland Canyon Fire

Fire is seen racing up the hillside of the Sutherland Canyon Fire on June 28, 2017. 

June 29, 2017.  The fire had expanded and was considered to be very complex.  The Northwest Team 11, a Type 2 IMT Team would become the new face of Command under IC, Nathan Rabe.  His team took command at 0600 hours on this date.  Fire had now burned up to 47,500 acres and had a 20% containment status. This fire was now reportedly burning 15 miles south of East Wenatchee.  275 personnel were assigned.

170701 Sutherland Canyon Fire

Red Flag weather conditions create active fire behavior as seen in this photo of the Sutherland Canyon Fire on June 29, 2017.

It was also said that on this second day in a row, RED FLAG conditions were warranted due to dry and gusty winds and due to extreme fire growth in steep and rugged terrain.  Both the Sutherland Canyon Fire and the Straight Hollow Fire merged into a single wildfire at the east and southeast flanks displaying the most active fire behavior in both of these locations.  Overnight, firefighters and bulldozers worked to construct and hold fire containment lines where they could engage the fire in a safe manner.  Fire officials were working to keep the fire from spreading towards nearby town of Quincy.

June 30, 2017.  Due to more accurate mapping and better visibility by aerial recon flights, the number of acres was reduced and discovered that the Sutherland  Canyon and the Straight Hollow fires did not actually merge together.  However, they were found to be burning 1/4 miles apart from one another.   The Incident Command Post or ICP was felt it necessary to move to the Quincy High School campus so that they could be closer to both fires.  Fire was now located 6 miles NW of Quincy. There had been 29,433 acres scorched and was now being reported as having a 50% containment.

July 1, 2017.  Fire Managers reported the fire was now at a 74% containment and holding at 29,433 acres.

July 2, 2017.  The fire was holding at 29,433 acres with a 90% containment status. This was said to be the last fire update.

STRAIGHT HOLLOW FIRE

June 30, 2017.  This fire was reported about 1/4 mile from the Sutherland Canyon fire.  11 miles northwest of Quincy.  8,458 acres. 75% contained.  It had been reported that this fire had merged into directly to the Sutherland Canyon Fire but later was determined not to be the case.

July 1, 2017.  Fire crews were still showing the fire was holding at 8,458 acres with a 75% containment status.

July 2, 2017.  8,458 acres. Containment status increased to 90%. No increase in acreage and minimal fire behavior observed.  Fire crews conducted patrolling, mop-up and repair operations. Additionally, repair work included building water bars, smoothing out berms and repairing fences cut during fire suppression efforts.  Aerial recon flights with infrared imaging equipment checked various areas for heat signatures. The Temporary Flight Restriction or TFR was lifted over the fire.  The NW Team 11 unit transitioned over to a local Type 3 IMT on Monday, July 3, 2017.

This was the final fire update.

SPARTAN FIRE

June 27, 2017.  The Spartan Fire was a second fire that ignited on June 26.  It was located five miles SE of Wenatchee with the same fire fuels.  160 firefighters were assigned including handcrews and dozers.  4,500 acres. 10% contained.  Active fire spread to the southwest.

170626 Spartan Fire

A USFS handcrew preps to work overnight on the Spartan Fire. Photo taken on June 26, 2017. (Credit: Holly Krake/USFS)

June 28, 2017.  No update.

June 29, 2017.  The fire grew to 9,000 acres scorched and had a 60% containment status.  It was now located nine miles SE of Wenatchee.  There were 50 personnel assigned.   Fire Officials were happy to report that all containment lines held and no new fire growth overnight. Crews were tasked with actively monitoring potential hotspots and patches of unburned grass within the fire perimeter.

170626 Planning

In order to lead and organize their fire crews, Interagency fire managers must work together to come up with a plan. Here they are working together doing just that. Spartan Fire on June 26, 2017. (Credit: Holly Krake/USFS)

June 30, 2017.  Fire activity showing minimal activity and that all containment lines continue to hold.  Crews were tasked with patrol and to begin repairing of fire line used during suppression efforts.  Two 24-hour shifts of fire crews have been assigned.

July 1, 2017.  The fire was deemed to have a 100% containment status and listed 8,730 acres burned.  Fire command was turned back over to a local fire jurisdiction which included Chelan FD and WA State DNR) at 0600 on Saturday.  This would be the last fire update from NW Team 11.

170629 Retardant Drop

Fire suppression from the air assists those on the ground as well, Without this resource would make ground crews’ jobs much more difficult.

RESOURCES

Multiple fire agencies came together for a single purpose – put the wildfire out.   The Incident Cooperators for this event was the BLM, Chelan County Office of Emergency Chelan Co OEM), Chelan County Fire District 6, Chelan County Sheriff Office and WA DNR.

EVACUATIONS

On June 29, 2017, Grant County had Level 2 evacuations in order for residents in parts of NW Quincy and southwest of Monument Hill.  Douglas County would instill Level 3 orders for those along the Palisades Road corridor and at the Hwy 28 Junction.  Level 2 were in effect for the Trinidad area along Mansfield Rd.  A church and the Humane Society opened their doors for people and their pets, as shelters.  Chelan County issued Level 1 orders for the Colockum Road, Kingsbury Road, Moss Carr Road, Ingersoll Road and Tarpiscan Road.

On June 30th, all evacuation orders were lifted.

SMOKE IMPACTS

Smoke impacts on June 29, 2017 were expected to spread to the east towards Quincy and reaching possibly to the furthest areas such as Spokane and Moses Lake.  It was likely that the light canyon winds would push up  the smoke into the Wenatchee Valley.

WILDFIRE STATS

FIRE FACT: In 2017, there were a total of 2,079 human-caused wildfires burning 262,328 total acres in WA & OR. OR: 906 fires, 172,887 acres WA: 1173 fires, 89,441 acres  year-to-date.

is everything.

FIRE IMAGES

All Fire Images not listing a Photo Credit underneath are due to multiple images used by the same Photographer/Source.  We give full photo credit to WA DNR – SE Region via Inciweb.  All photo credits have been given to the best of our ability.  We give KUDOS to the men and women behind the camera showcasing firefighters in action from the air and on the ground.

[Source:  GACC/NWCC]

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog

 

New Fire Start in WA | September 30 2017

POST SUMMARY | Fire season has mostly been dwindled down from over 30 wildfires to less than 10, except for Douglas County in Washington with a new fire start.  Here is our recap for Saturday, September 30, 2017.

WHITEHALL FIRE 

Image may contain: cloud, sky, mountain, outdoor and nature

Photo Credit: Grant County Fire District #13

Around 1216 hours today, a very large fire broke out near Whitehall Road and Road 7 SE and about 12 miles East of Coulee City (WA) from an unknown cause.   Firefighters from Ephrata FD, Grant County Fire Districts 5, 3 and 13 were dispatched as mutual aid for Douglas County and Coulee City Fire.   At that time, structure protection units were also requested.

At 1420 hours, Firefighters were still actively fighting this fire with increased behavior including wind-driven runs and spotting over containment lines.  BLM and DNR were also on-scene and assisting along with Grant County District 4.  Air resources were requested by BLM to deploy to this fast-moving wildfire that is now said to be threatening some structures in the area, where some firefighters are working and have in place structure protection.

Due to the increased wind, the fire has quickly grown from a small 1,000 acres to up to 15,000 in less than an hour with a 0% containment status!  With this being said, State mobe has been requested for assistance.  It was approved at 1545 hours the Washington State Patrol, the Agency that oversees the State Fire Marshal’s Office.

Smoke was visible from Ephrata/Soap Lake areas.

HIGH CASCADES COMPLEX

Teamwork to remove debris cleared for containment lines on the Broken Lookout Fire.

Photo Credit: John Moyer

Consists of Pup and Broken Lookout Fires.  (East Zone). Fire update also includes the West Zone.

Pup Fire.  8,279 acres. 42% containment status. Located NW and SE of Hershberger Lookout partially in the Rogue-Umpqua Divide Wilderness (OR).  Repair work being done on a secondary dozer and hand lines.

Broken Lookout Fire.  19,181 acres. 27% containment. Located directly west of Union Creek on the Southern end of the Rogue-Umpqua Divide Wilderness.

Total Resources for both Zones include 462 personnel, 2 Type 2 Ia crews, 6 Type 2 crews, 6 camp crews, 8 engines, 4 masticators, 2 medium helicopters, 2 light helicopters, 1 bulldozer, 2 water tenders and 189 overhead personnel.

Incident Command consists of the NW IMT Team 8 (West Zone) that is located at the Joseph Stewart State Park near Lost Creek Reservoir SW of Prospect, OR.  A Spike camp is located at Milo Academy near Milo, OR.

EAGLE CREEK FIRE

Beargrass sprouts in burned area - Beargrass is resprouting in some areas that burned in the Eagle Creek Fire. This area is west of Tanner Creek on the BPA right of way.

Beargrass (Life) is starting to sprout again in burned area. Photo Credit: Inciweb

The Eagle Creek fire has now reached 48,831 acres with a 46% containment status.  It is located on lands inside the Columbia River Gorge National Park in Oregon.

A cold front arrived over the fire and delivered up to a 1/4 inch of rain on Friday helped make the ground brush damp enough to not stop fire repair efforts.  Rain and cooler temps are expected throughout the weekend with a broadcasted message to crews to be extra careful of potentially dangerous slippery conditions and other hazards that could impact their safety.

Resources assigned to this wildfire are 4 hand crews, 4 engines, 1 helicopter, 10 excavators, 1 dozer, 3 chippers, 1 feller-buncher, 1 forwarder, 1 processor, 1 log loader, 3 skidders, 1 road grader and 229 total personnel.

CHETCO BAR FIRE

Store Gulch GS, Illinois River, Unwrapping back side of structure, Sep 22, 2017

Structure protection of the Store Gulch GS. Photo Credit: Inciweb

The Chetco Bar Fire’s Rogue River – Siskiyou NF personnel will host a public meeting this evening at 1800 hours at the Illinois Valley H.S. located at 625 East River Street in Cave Junction, OR.  They will provide a historical update on the fire.    Fire suppression work will continue, to continue patrol for any hotspots and put them out.  The Temporary Flight Restriction or TFR has been lifted.

UMPQUA NORTH COMPLEX

The Umpqua North Complex consists of several fires. Total acres burned have been 43,158 with a 79% containment status. This fire originally started on August 11, 2017 from lightning.  Command is being led by a Nevada Type 3 iMT Team 2.

Burn Operation in Toketee Falls

Burn out operations in Toketee Falls. Photo Credit: Inciweb

Current resources on-scene are 2 crews, 1 helicopter, 7 engines, 2 bulldozers, 1 grinder, 5 water tenders, 11 pieces of other heavy equipment such as excavators, dump trucks, front end loaders, chippers and the list goes on. There are 216 total personnel assigned to this incident.

MILLER COMPLEX FIRE

The Miller Complex Fire is located on private land and federal land on the Rogue River – Siskiyou National Forest 20 miles west of Ashland, OR.    Currently, the fire is listed at 37,045 acres destroyed with a 85% containment status.  This fire started on August 14, 2017 from lightning.  There are 187 personnel still assigned to this incident.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog – Updated 9/302/017 – 1655 hours PDT

Nationally Fires Are Dwindling | Sept 28 2017

POST SUMMARY | Nationally speaking, the number of large and uncontained wildfires are down.  Reported today, there were 62 new fires that required light initial attack activity.  Three of these were new large incidents, says the National Interagency Coordination Center or NICC for short.

However, there are multiple fires with minimal fire behavior.  One fire was contained as of yesterday, which is good news considering how long of these fires have been burning up the NW landscapes all around us.

We are still seeing that 3 Type 1 and 12 Type 2 IMTs are still committed in our along along with one NIMO.

Fire Fact:  As of today, there are 66 active wildfires staffed by 192 crews, 521 engines, 42 helicopters and 9,028 personnel.  Overall, 1,595,667 acres have been scorched.

The NW is reporting as of today’s date, there are 7 new wildfires and thankfully, none of them are new large incidents.  However, 9 of them are being still classified as uncontained.  We are still seeing 2 Type 1 and 6 Type 2 IMTs that are committed in our region.

This is our recap for Wednesday, September 28, 2017.

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Horse Prairie Fire Panoramic Photo

HORSE PRAIRIE FIRE.  Douglas Forest Protective Association.  15 miles West of Canyonville (OR).  Started 8/26/2017 @ 1530 hours.  Unknown cause. Local Type 3 IMT (DFPA unit).  Timber (litter/understory), brush and short grass. 16,436 acres.  95% contained. 57 personnel.  Fire crews to continue to mop up in all Divisions.

Repair of dozer line, Div X, near O'Brien and FR 455

CHETCO BAR LIFE. Rogue River – Siskiyou NF.  Kalmiopsis Wilderness in the Illinois River Valley.  Lightning caused.  Timber, chaparral and Douglas Fir.  Minimal fire behavior with smoldering.  191,088 acres.  97% contained.  541 personnel. 

This map shows the perimeters of the fires in the Horse Creek Complex and the Rebel Fire for Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017

HORSE CREEK COMPLEX.  Willamette National Forest.  (5 fires) AVENUE FIRE.  McKenzie River Ranger District.  3 miles SE of McKenzie Bridge. Started 8/11/2017 by Lightning. 3,574 acres.    OLALLIE LOOKOUT FIRE.  McKenzie River Ranger District within the Three Sisters Wilderness.  Started 8/10/2017 by Lightning. 1,572 acres.  RONEY FIRE.  McKenzie River Ranger District with the Three Sisters Wilderness.  8/10/2017 by Lightning. 3,548 acres.  SEPARATION FIRE.  McKenzie River Ranger District within the Three Sisters Wilderness.  Started 8/10/2017 by lightning.  17,914 acres.  NASH FIRE.  Willamette NF in the McKenzie River Ranger District within Three Sisters Wilderness area. Started 8/10/2017 by Lightning.  6,738 acres.  170 total personnel.  Minimal fire behavior on all fires with smoldering.

Clearing Area Around Cabin at Goose Prairie

NORSE PEAK FIRE.  Okanogan/Wenatchee NF.  Minimal fire behavior with isolated pockets of slow surface spread where the fire is sheltered by tree canopy and continued burning in larger dead of downed trees. 55,909 acres.  AMERICAN FIRE.   Minimal fire behavior.  99% contained. 

 

 

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog – Updated 9/28/2017 @ 2050 hours PDT

 

 

 

Temps Up, Fire Starts Down | Sept 25 2017

POST SUMMARY | With a combination of recent rainfall, temps are predicted to be in the high 60’s and even 70’s in the Seattle area.  Things are beginning to dry out but fire starts are relatively down across the Nation.

 On Saturday, nationally there were only 31 new fires requiring light initial attack and on Sunday there was a report of 28 which means things are starting to cool off.   Today, there has been an increase up to 55 new wildfires reported and still 18 wildfires not contained.

Nationally speaking, there are 2 NIMOs, 2 Type 1 and 15 Type 2 IMTs still being committed to wildfire incidents.

In the NW region, today’s report was of 5 new fires and none of them being reported as new large incidents.  However, 12 of the 18 large fires are all burning in the NW with 1 NIMO, 2 Type 1 and 6 Type 2 IMTs committed. (Source:   NIFC)

Here is our recap on Monday, September 25, 2017.

 CHETCO BAR FIRE  (1)

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, sky and outdoor

Rogue River – Siskiyou NF. 17 miles W of Selma and E/NE of Brookings, OR.  In the Kalmiopsis Wilderness.  Start 7/12/2017. Lightning caused.  Burning in the 2002 Biscuit Fire and 1987 Silver Fire burn scars.  Timber (litter/understory), medium logging slash and chaparral (6′).   #ChetcoBarFire

Incident Cooperators include the Red Cross, BLM, USDA Forest Service, Brookings Fire & Rescue, Coos FPA, Curry County, Harbor RFPD, Illinois Valley FD, Josephine County (JoCo), OR DOT – Trip Check, ODOF and the OR State FMO’s office. 

 191,067 acres.  97% contained.   730 personnel.  15 crews, 21 engines and 7 helos.  

30 structures destroyed.  $60,900,000 cost-to-date.

Sources: NIFC, NWCC, Facebook (made up of BLM, Coos Forest Protective Association, OR State FMO, Rogue River-Siskiyou NF, OR DOF and PNW Team 3 IMT)

DESOLATION FIRE (2)

Ochoco NF.  20 miles NE Prineville, OR in the Mill Creek Wilderness.  Started 9/9/2017. Lightning.  Burning in the 2000 Hash Rock Fire scar.  #DesolationFire

Moderate fire behavior with flanking and backing.  4,512 acres. 30% contained.

49 personnel. 2 crews. $1,300,000 cost-to-date.

(NIFC, Inciweb)

DIAMOND CREEK FIRE (3)

 Okanogan – Wenatchee NF.  11 miles NNW of Mazama, WA. Started 7/23/2017. Cause is unknown & under investigation. Fire still burning in the United States and in Canada where it crossed over.  #DiamondCreekFire

Image may contain: mountain, sky, cloud, grass, outdoor and nature

Hidden Lakes. (Photo Credit: Michael Liu, Methow Valley RD Ranger)

Minimal fire behavior with backing, smoldering and creeping. 127,498 acres. 79% contained.

Image may contain: sky, snow, mountain, cloud, outdoor and nature

Spanish Camp in 9/22/2017. (Photo Credit: Michael Liu, Methow Valley RD Ranger)

188 personnel. 6 crews, 1 engines, 1 helicopter. 

Image may contain: mountain, sky, outdoor and nature

A copter appears in the fire area. (Photo Credit: Diamond Creek Fire Facebook)

3 structures lost. $14,500,000 cost-to-date. 

(NIFC, NWCC, Facebook)

Lake with snow around it and trees surrounding the lake that are not all burned

Remmel Lake. Photo taken on September 22, 2017. (Photo Credit: Michael Liu, Methow Valley RD Ranger)

EAGLE CREEK FIRE (4) 

Point protection on Herman Creek Footbridge 9/11/17

Point protection on Herman Creek Footbridge. Photo taken on September 11, 2017

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. 1 mile South from Cascade Locks, OR.  Started 9/2/2017 around 1600 hours PDT.  Timber (large trees), dense forest and open grass (1 foot tall). Human caused & under investigation. #EagleCreekFire

 

Minimal fire behavior. 48,668 acres. 46% contained.

156 personnel. 2 crews, 6 engines, 1 helicopter. 

4 structures lost. $15,200,000 cost-to-date.

HIGH CASCADE COMPLEX (5)  

Rogue River – Siskiyou NF.  9 miles NE of Prospect, OR.  3 fires. All 3 started by lightning.  Over 40 fires ignited west of Crater Lake after lightning storms hit the area in July and August.  #HighCascadesComplex

This complex is host to 5 fires. Minimal fire behavior with smoldering.  79,870 acres.  32% contained.

853 personnel. 21 crews, 21 engines and 5 helicopters.

1 structure lost. $60,500,000 cost-to-date.

Bessie's cabin wrapped in fire protective covering to protect from Blanket Creek fire.

A wrapped Bessie’s cabin.

HORSE CREEK COMPLEX (6) 

Willamette NF.  7 miles S of Belknap, OR.  IMT is also managing Rebel Fire.  Started 8/21/2017. Cause unknown and is being investigated.  Timber, litter and light logging slash.  Fire managers are also managing the Rebel Fire.  Transfer of command from a Type 1 IMT to the local unit will occur on 9/28/2017.  #HorseCreekComplex

Sept 15 - Firefighters use water pumps to protect buildings at Boy Scout Camp Malakwa. Angela Yost photo

Usage of water pumps are implementation of structure protection. (Photo Credit: Angela Yost)

Totals:  41,873 acres. (A more accurate reported acres due to an Infrared flight was conducted).  337 personnel,. 5 crews, 1 helicopter, 15 engines, 3 water tenders and 1 skidgen.

Firefighters have been busy pulling hose that was laid on fires in the Horse Creek Complex and Rebel Fire. So far, they have pulled approximately 15 miles of hose and they're not done yet. Tim Mowry/Alaska IMT

This is what 15 miles of hose looks like. This was just the beginning. (Photo Credit: Tim Mowry, AK IMT)

Horse Creek Complex:  Minimal fire behavior.  33,170 acres. 64% contained. 247 personnel. 5 crews, 1 engine and 1 helicopter. $9,200,000 cost-to-date.

Rebel Fire:  Minimal fire behavior. 8,703 acres. 88% contained. Crews are salvaging logging which is near being complete. 65 personnel. 1 crew, 3 engines. $7,200,000 cost-to-date.

Olallie Lookout Fire:  1,572 acres.  Being monitored.

Roney Fire:  3,548 acres.  Being monitored.

Coils of rolled up fire hose are piled on pallets at the Hoodoo Incident Command Post on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. Tim Mowry/Alaska IMT

Hose rolling operation. (Photo Credit: Tim Mowry, AK IMT)

Avenue Fire:  3,398 acres.  Dozer and hand lines installed will continue to dry out this weekend. Repair work will continue next week.

Separation Fire:  17,914 acres.  Hand lines are being stabilized on the NW side of this fire. NE of the fire, chipping operations will be completed.

Michael Clendenen from Fagen Trees and Chips of Bend, Ore. operates a chipper along Forest Service Road 19 on Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017. Tim Mowry/Alaska IMT

Chipping operations in effect. (Photo Credit: Tim Mowry, AK IMT)

Nash Fire:  6,738 acres.

HORSE PRAIRIE FIRE (7)

OR DOF – Central Unit.  15 miles NW of Canyonville, OR. Started 8/26/2017.  Cause unknown.  Timber (litter and understory) and medium logging slash.  #HorsePrairieFire

No known fire behavior. 16,436 acres. 95% contained.

48 personnel.  2 crews, 1 engine.

2 structures lost. $16,300,000.

JOLLY MOUNTAIN (8 )

13 miles NW of Cle Elum, WA on the Okanogan – Wenatchee NF.  #JollyMountanFire #JollyMtnFire

Video of Friday's (9/15/2017) burnout operation along Road 903 north of Cle Elum Lake. This was a key part of the fire strategy – to bring the fire's northwestern edge down to the road under favorable conditions.

Burnout operations on 9/15/2017.

Minimal fire behavior. 36,808 acres. 45% contained. 

119 personnel. 2 crews, 12 engines and 0 helicopters. 

$24,800,000 cost-to-date.

JONES FIRE, KELSEY CREEK FIRE (9,10) 

Siuslaw hand crew building fireline

Willamette NF. 11 miles E of Oakridge, OR.  Burning on the Middle Fork Ranger District. Timber. Reported on 9/9/2017. Lightning caused. #JonesFire #KelseyCreekFire

Jones Fire:  10 miles NE of Lowell, OR.  Minimal fire behavior. 10,220 acres. 80% contained. 85 personnel. 2 crews, 1 engine and 2 helicopters. 1 structure lost. $21,100,000 cost-to-date. 

Kelsey Creek Fire:  11 miles East of Oakridge, OR. Minimal fire behavior. 441 acres. 15% contained.  225 personnel. 6 crews, 5 engines and 1 helicopter. $2,200,000 cost-to-date.

Firefighter working Kelsey Fire

Working on the Kelsey Fire. (Credit: Gina Troy via Inciweb)

 MILLER COMPLEX (11)

 Rogue River – Siskiyou NF. 17 miles E of Cave Junction and 20 miles West of Ashland, OR.  Started 8/14/2017 around 1400 hours PDT with 25 wildfires.   Timber, mixed conifer understory with Shasta Red Dir dominance and numerous snags.  Lightning caused. Type 3 IMT assumed command on Friday, September 22, 2017.  Due to fire behavior decreased, a Type 3 IMT has been moved into place.  #MillerComplex

Incident Cooperators include Harbor Rural Fire Protection Dept., OR State Fire Marshal, OR DOT, OR DOF, RRSNF.  

Totals: 36,496 acres. 70% contained. 167 personnel.  Fire behavior moderate in some areas, limited to creeping, smoldering and backing in others.

Abney Fire:  Fire crews to identify ways to limit fire spread and improve existing contingency lines.

Burnt Peak Fire: Being monitored.

Creedence Fire:  Being monitored.

Knox Fire:  Being monitored by air and showing little fire activity.

Fire behavior is minimal on the Miller Complex after this week's cool, wet weather. However, the fire is not out. Photo credit: Jacob Welsh

A fire smolders after a big rainfall on the Miller Complex.

MILLI FIRE (12 )

9 miles West of Sisters, OR on the Deschutes NF.  #MilliFire

Minimal fire behavior.  24,025 acres. 85% contained.

7 personnel. 0 resources.  

$16,800,000 cost-to-date.

NORSE PEAK FIRE (13) 

Okanogan – Wenatchee NF.  11 miles W of Cliffdell, WA. 3 fires.  Fire has been broken into 2 different zones (North and South). Started 8/11/2017. Lightning. Timber (litter and understory), heavy dead and down materials.

Fire Managers are also managing the American Fire.  Total personnel. 135 and included in totals are 4 crews and 5 engines.  Under SE of fire, a Naches Ranger District Type 4 is in Command. NW side of fire is a Type 3 IMT located at the Expo Center in Enumclaw.

Norse Peak Fire:  52,056 acres. 80% contained.  NW side:  cleanup and fire suppression restoration in progress. Under a monitoring phase: an active portion of fire near SR 410.  All Level 3 evacuations have been lifted.

American Fire:  3,853 acres. 99% contained.  Minimal fire growth is expected.  All Level 3 evacuations have been lifted.

Clearing Area Around Cabin at Goose Prairie

Clearing around a Goose Prairie cabin.

UMPQUA NORTH COMPLEX (14)

Umpqua NF.  50 miles East of Roseburg, OR.   (6 fires) Started 8/11/2017. Lightning caused.  Timber, forest litter, grass and shrubs are fire fuels. Great Basin IMT 3, a Type 2 IMT team assumed command on 9/15/2017 @ 1900 hours PDT. #UmpquaNorthComplex

This complex is host to 6 fires.   Minimal fire behavior.  43,140 acres. 60% contained.

456 personnel. 17 crews, 9 engines and 2 helicopters. 

1 structure lost. $38,200,000 cost-to-date.

Working the hose roller

Hose rolling operation.

WHITEWATER FIRE (15)

The Whitewater Fire includes reporting of Little Devil Fire, Scorpion Fire, Clagett Lake, Slideout Fire, Section Line Fire, French Fire and Potato Hill Fire. Located on the Willamette NF and 10 miles East of Idanha, OR. Closed timber, timber (litter and understory), light logging slash and snags are throughout the area.  #WhitewaterFire

Minimal behavior.  14,451 acres. 47% contained. 

September 22, 2017 photo of a westerly view from Heli-spot 4 on the Whitewater Fire

View from the Heli-spot 4 on the Whitewater Fire. Photo taken on 9/22/2017.

372 personnel. 7 crews, 5 engines. 

$36,600,000 cost-to-date.

SOURCES.  NIFC, NWCC, Inciweb, Facebook.

FIRE IMAGES.  All fire images have been given appropriate Photo Credit respectively and to the best of our ability.  We do not lie claim to any of them. 

If a Photo Credit is not listed for the fire image, it is implied that it is a Courtesy/Credit Photo from Inciweb.  Inciweb is an interagency that gleans information  from various Fire Departments, Districts, Forest Service and other Agencies working together. 

Photos are uploaded from various Firefighters, Strike Teams, IMTs, Incident Command, etc.  We respect their roles in where they play in obtaining these photos.  They often give us a great front row seat in looking through their eyes and under what conditions lie before them.

(c) 2017 NW Fire Blog – Updated 9/23/2017 – 1830 hours PDT