Long Pine Key Wildfire in Florida’s Everglades National Park Almost Contained

FIRE SUMMARY

The Long Pine Key Wildfire was originally discovered as a small fire between the amphitheater and a day-use area on the West end of the Long Pine Key campground inside the Everglades National Park on Sunday, April 10, 2016, at 1200 hours.

The Park is located just outside of Homestead, Florida.

The wildfire burning up thousands of acres. Photo Credit: Everglades National Park.

Less than two hours later, the fire quickly consumed up to 300 acres by 1330 hours with a 0% containment status due to winds that picked up  to 20 m.p.h.

A crew member from Puerto Rico. Photo Credit: Everglades National Park.

FIRE STATUS

On Friday, April 15th, the fire had reached a 54% containment status but not before it burned up 3800 acres of land.

Today on Saturday, April 16th, fire crews have successfully reached a 90% containment status and still holding at 3800 acres. There is minimal fire behavior along with creeping and smoldering.  Fire crews will continue to contain the perimeter of the fire and all day-use trails within that perimeter.

WEATHER FORECAST

Concerns of a future thunderstorm along with gusty and additional erratic winds and lightning are on the horizon.

RESOURCES

The incident still has 60 personnel assigned with Incident Cooperators include but are not limited to the Fish & Wildlife Service, the Big Cypress Reserve, the Loxahatchie National Wildlife Reserve, Georgia Forestry Commission, crews from Puerto Rico and the Miami-Dade Office of Emergency Management.

A Georgia Forestry Commission crew. Photo Credit: Everglades National Park.

CAUSE & THREATS

There is no word on what is the origin of the first or the cost-to-date amounts are at the time of this post.  There is also no information on if any structures or other assets were damaged or being threatened.

Fire Suppression from above, is always a welcome sight for Fire Crews. Photo Credit: Everglades National Park.

This will be our last post unless significant activity occurs.

(c) 2016 The #NWFireBlog