Everett Firefighters Battle Extreme Fire Conditions at #MarineviewFire – June 5, 2016

Updated  Hours 0155 Hours PDT

INCIDENT SUMMARY

A 3-Alarm fire broke out at an Everett recycling plant located at 100 block of E Marine View Drive prompted the response of multiple Snohomish County jurisdictions to descend upon the almost 100,000 square foot facility on Saturday evening.

We picked up the 3rd alarm Scanner Feed coverage and the spread of #FireImages, as well as those tweeting about the incident around 1950 Hours.

At the peak of the fire, it was said that almost 100 firefighters were on-scene.

Fire at I-5 / 12th Street. (Credit: WSDOT)

Fire at I-5 / 12th Street. (Credit: WSDOT)

OPERATIONS

Staffing

Firefighters were faced with a destructive Fire Monster on Saturday when a 3rd Alarm rang out just before 2000 Hours PDT.  Firefighters from Marysville, Lynnwood and Everett responded and quickly arrived.

Multiple Engines, Ladders, Medics and Aid units arrived on-scene.

BNSF Train Traffic

The Wildland Fire group was forced to lay lines over the train tracks to get to the spot fires.  Train traffic has been halted due to the continued fire suppression tactics to control the spot fires that had been occurring.

Water Supply Group

Due to the enormous fire and multiple locations for water, a Water Supply Group was established and worked really well, once everyone was aware of the Division set up to assist with water resources.

Several significant events occurred from an Engine company running over to Motor Trucks hydrant and load up on water then bring it back to the fire scene.  Another event occurred where one engine had to lay 700 ft of hose line to the hydrant while another engine laid an additional 700-800 ft of hose line from the Engine hooked to the hydrant to the intended destination.

Staging

Staging was very active with incoming units and deploying others to various areas of the fire building and exposures. Fire Marshal 3 was very instrumental in working with this Division closely and tying into other fire operations.

5 Water Tenders were in the Water Supply group at one time.

COLLAPSE ZONES

Several alerts were given to Firefighters about collapse zones around the fire building and talking about walls buckling.

Our skies were black as night compared to orange in the air from outside fires in 2015. (Credit: LR Swenson)

FIRE TACTICS

Utilities

Gas was secured within one hour of the 3-alarm was elevated, however, fire crews were reporting needing the power to be shut off due to receiving light power burns from the water.

Due to the PUD Representative not available on site, Fire crews were ready to shut off power themselves, when an Engineering employee arrived and assisted personnel by securing the power.

The Before Photo (Credit: Found on the Web)

The Before Photo (Credit: Found on the Web)

Repositioning Crews

Ladder 15 was definitely one of the most widely used assets during initial fire operations on June 4th, when it was needed to move from the one side of the building to the other.  When this request was approved, they were needed to drive around the fire building but apparatus and hose lines were in their path.

One Engine company that had their monitor on, was instructed to shut it off and unhook their 4″ hose line then hook it up again with the 4″ hose line, while pumping and backing up.

A Ladder shut down his Masterstream operations to allow the needed Ladder 15 to pass.

The original Engine Company was completely back on the hydrant pumping again.

Search and Rescue

Firefighters searched several trailers to ensure no occupants in them.  Searches were conducted and nothing was found.

ACTIVE FIRE CALLS

A fire alarm was dispatched to a structure listed as the Bravo 2 exposure building but appears that nothing was found.

 

ABOUT THE BUILDING SCHEMATICS

Recycling Plant Info

Many various sources are reporting that the building is listed on “West Marine View Drive” and “East Marine View Drive”, which may seem confusing. It definitely was to us so we did a little fact-finding check ourselves.

We could only find one Recycling plant on this roadway under the name of Busy Beaver Recycling.  It appears that it was still operational.  One of it s neighbor is Everett Engineering and firefighters were working to save the building.

We found this to be a commercial building located at 100 East Marine View Drive in Everett, Washington, a 98,350 Retail Square Foot sized facility owned by a LLC organization.  It is said to have a monthly building rent of $44,220 per month.  The building has 18,476 – 98,267 retail square feet availability in a 7.7 acre heavily commercial zoned industrial park.

It was built-in 1952 and has one floor.

The building is have an estimated value of $4.9 Million.

SOCIAL MEDIA

marineview fire at snohomish bridge 2140

Facility Address

One source reported that there was another fire at the same building (this same location) but was reported as another address (East instead of West Marine View Drive).  We were not sure if these were two separate buildings or one.

Previous Fire Activity

Another media outlet went on to say there have been three incidents at this same location but were did not see where Everett FD confirmed this.  The one source stated there was one fire that was under investigation when there were burning cardboard and debris found inside the facility.  It was quickly extinguished and nothing happened.

Communities Impacted

Residents and Tweeters alike were beginning to flood Social Media with amazing photos of the incident, while some of us began smelling the strong odor of a fire burning.

This is the kind of smoke that can make you deathly ill.  Smoke was visible from Lynnwood, Bellevue, Renton and other areas.  Residents in the Bellevue area advised they could smell the black smoke that hung in the Puget Sound area.

Please take precautions to protect your immune system, including your eyes, ears and sensitive lungs.

UPDATES

We will provide more  updates as they arrive. Thank you for following us.

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