U.S. Wildland Fires | SitRep | Feb 25, 2016

FIRE SUMMARY

According to the National Interagency Fire Center, 36 new large Wildfires were reported this week alone sparking no debate that the Fire Season has officially begun. Fires were reportedly primarily 5 States: Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Florida.

Located in the Southern area, 315 new fires were reported.  Additionally, 30 new large incidents were reported along with 8 of them being not contained fires.  28 Fires were contained by U.S. Firefighters.

Approximately 34,688 combined acres have been scorched.  States are currently still reporting fire info even at the time of this post.

wf1

Grand Bature Wildfire. Credit: USFWS

ACTIVE U.S. WILDFIRES

ARKANSAS

5 Mile

12 miles NE of Broken Arrow. Agency:  Ozark &  St. Francis NF [Forest Service]. 6 Personnel.  3 Engines.  692 acres. 60% contained.  Timber and hardwood litter. Moderate fire behavior with backing, creeping and flanking.  Estimated Cost-to-Date $200,000.

MISSISSIPPI

Grand Bature

Grand Bay Wildlife Refuge [Fish & Wildland Services], 4 East of Pascagoula.  12 Personnel.  1 Engine. 1 Helo.  4349 acres. 90% contained.  Tall grass, southern rough and timber.  Minimal fire behavior with smoldering.  Structures threatened.  Trail closures in effect. Estimated Cost-to-Date $235,000.

OKLAHOMA

Big Bluestem  

10 miles W of Pawhuska. Osage Field Office [BIA].  10 Personnel.  3 Engines.  989 acres. 80% contained.  Estimated Cost-to-Date $11,000.

Buffalo

8 miles W of Buffalo.   Oklahoma DOF.  18,000 acres. 30% contained.  107 personnel. 40 Engines. Extreme fire behavior with wind-driven runs and spotting. Structures threatened.   Tall grass and brush. Minimal fire behavior.  Estimated Cost-to-Date $50,000.

Fife  

3 miles W of Hanna.  Okmulgee Field Office [BIA].  19 Personnel.  2 Crews.  3 Engines. 462 acres.  70% contained.  Tall grass, hardwood litter and short grass. Minimal fire behavior. Structures threatened.  Estimated Cost-to-Date $10,000.

Gap  

30 miles SE of McAlester.  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  6 personnel. 900 acres.  75% contained.  Hardwood litter and short grass. Moderate fire behavior with backing, creeping and smoldering.  Estimated Cost-to-Date $5,000.

wf3

Grand Bature Fire. Credit: USFWS

Pawnee Cove

10 miles W of  Terlton.  Osage Agency [BIA].  128 Personnel. 50 Engines. 2500 acres.  20% contained.   Tall grass and hardwood litter.  Extreme fire behavior with wind-driven runs.  Numerous structures threatened.  Evacuations and road closures in effect. 50 Structures lost. Estimated Cost-to-Date $75,000.

Sand Creek

6 miles SW of Henryetta.  Dept. of Forestry [ST]. 18 Personnel.  9 Engines. 4950 acres.  15% contained.   Hardwood litter and tall grass.  Extreme fire behavior with wind-driven runs and spotting.  Numerous structures threatened. Estimated Cost-to-Date $25,000.

Southfork

7 miles NE of Clayton.  SE area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  12 Personnel.  5 Engines. 820 acres.  50% contained. Hardwood litter. Active fire behavior with running.  Estimated Cost-to-Date $20,000.

Tree Farm

8 miles W of Sapulpa.  Okmulgee Field Office [BIA].  23 Personnel.  2 Crew. 3 Engines. 1126 acres.  40% contained. Hardwood litter. Minimal fire behavior. Structures threatened.  Estimated Cost-To-Date $5,000.

Grand Bature Fire. Credit: USFWS

Grand Bature Fire. Credit: USFWS

YEAR TO DATE STATS [from January 1st – February 19th]

  • 2016:  2395 Fires.  78,962 acres.
  • 2015:  2871 Fires.   26,847 acres.
  • 2014:  3095 Fires.   42,558 acres.
  • 2013:  1569 Fires.   10,961 acres.
  • 2012: 2889 Fires.   62,533 acres.
  • 2011:  2996 Fires.   52,391 acres.
  • 2010: 1407 Fires.   21,461 acres.

Since 2006 – 2015, the average of fires have been around 3900+ and scorching over 110,000 acres.

WEATHER FORECAST

A relatively progressive flow across the U.S. this week will provide an active weather pattern with a series of storms progressing from West to East.

This will include the northwest quarter of the Nation as well as northern California and the Great Basin. The exception will be across the southwest and Plains regions this weekend where dry weather will continue.

This prolonged dry period will transition on Sunday with showers and thunderstorms developing over the central and southern Plains.

Showers and thunderstorms will expand along a frontal boundary through the southeast and Mid-Atlantic by the middle of next week before spreading north along the east coast.

Late next week, a ridge of high pressure will attempt to strengthen along the Pacific coast with an overall drier and warmer pattern developing. [NIFC]

PREPAREDNESS LEVEL

Level 1.

 

[c] 2016 The #NWFireBlog

 

 

 

 

 

National Fires | SitRep | Feb 23, 2016

According to the Natonal Interagency Fire Center, 36 new large Wildfires were reported this week alone sparking no debate that the Fire Season has officially begun. Fires were reportedly primarily 5 States: Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Florida.

Firefighters were able to 28 of those fires this week.  Approximately 34,688 combined acres have been scorched.  States are currently still reporting fire info even at the time of this post.

wf1

Grand Bature Wildfire. Credit: USFWS

U.S. WILDFIRES

ARKANSAS

  • 5 Mile:  12 miles NE of Broken Arrow. Agency:  Ozark &  St. Francis NF [Forest Service]. 692 acres. 60% contained.
  • Big Point: Agency: Ozark & St. Francis NF [Forest Service]. 4122 acres. 100% contained.

FLORIDA

  • Wood Lake: National Forests in Florida [Forest Service].  1004 acres.  100% contained.
  • Norwalk: National Forests in Florida [Forest Service].  309 acres. 100% contained.

HAWAII

  • Puu Anahulu:  Hawaii County [County Fire].  300 acres. 100% contained.

KANSAS

  • 121st Road:  Cowley County [County Fire].  300 acres. 100% contained.

MISSISSIPPI

  • Grand Bature: Grand Bay Wildlife Refuge [Fish & Wildland Services], 4 East of Pascagoula. 4349 acres. 90% contained.
  • Ansley:  Forestry Commission [Private].  798 acres. 100% contained.
  • Lower Bay:  Forestry Commission [Private].  886 acres. 100% contained.
  • Ranch Road:  Forestry Commission [Private].  600 acres. 100% contained.

MISSOURI

  • Big Creek:  Mark Twain NF [Forest Service].  1178 acres. 100% contained.
  • High Hill: Mark Twain NF [Forest Service]. 231 acres. 100% contained.
  • Silo: Mark Twain NF [Forest Service]. 178 acres. 100% contained.
  • Merriam Cemetery: Mark Twain NF [Forest Service].  110 acres. 100% contained.

NEW MEXICO

  • Valentin Complex:  Captain District, State Forestry. 1083 acres. 100% contained.
  • Rumuda:  Mascatero Agency {BIA]. 619 acres. 100% contained.

OKLAHOMA

  • Big Bluestem:  10 miles W of Pawhuska. Osage Field Office [BIA].  989 acres. 80% contained.
  • Buffalo:  8 miles W of Buffalo.  Dept. of Forestry [ST]. 18,000 acres. 30% contained.
  • Fife:   3 miles W of Hanna.  Okmulgee Field Office [BIA].  462 acres.  70% contained.
  • Gap:  30 miles SE of McAlester.  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  900 acres.  75% contained.
  • Pawnee Cove:  10 miles W of  Terlton.  Osage Agency [BIA].  2500 acres.  20% contained.
  • Sand Creek:   6 miles SW of Henryetta.  Dept. of Forestry [ST]. 4950 acres.  15% contained.
  • Southfork:   12 miles NE of Broken Bow. SE area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  820 acres.  50% contained.
  • Tree Farm:  8 miles W of Sapulpa.  Okmulgee Field Office [BIA].  1126 acres.  90% contained.
  • Coyote:  SE Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  1000 acres.  100% contained.
  • Coyote [2]:  Dept. of Forestry [ST].  350 acres.  100% contained.
  • Dead Mule:  EastCentral Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST]. 300 acres. 100% contained.
  • Dipping Vat:  East Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  275 acres. 100% contained.
  • Gilmore:  Dept. of Forestry [ST].  300 acres.  100% contained.
  • Jackson:  Dept. of Forestry [ST].  746 acres. 100% contained.
  • Miner:  NE Area, Dept of Forestry [ST].  400 acres.  100 contained.
  • Monster:  NE Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  500 acres. 100 contained.
  • No Way:  Eastern Area Oklahoma [BIA]. 326 acres. 100% contained.
  • Pear Grove:  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  116 acres. 100% contained
  • Quinton:  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  1070 acres. 100% contained.
  • Rock Pit:  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  260 acres.  100% contained.
  • Suicide Hill:  Eastern Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  540 acres.  100% contained.
  • Teresita:  NE Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  350 acres.  100% contained.
  • Tucker Knob:  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  200 acres.  100% contained.
  • Weber Mountain:  E Central Area, Dept. of Forestry [ST].  300 acres.  100% contained.

TEXAS

  • Carol Ranch:  TX Forest Service [PR1]. 2125 acres. 100% contained
  • CR440:  TX Forest Service [PR1].  866 acres. 100% contained.
  • Crossfire:  TX Forest Service [ST]. 327 acres.  100% contained.
  • Estate:  TX Forest Service [ST]. 1000 acres. 100% contained.
  • FM998:  TX Forest Service [PR1].  3987 acres.  100% contained.
  • Jim Ned Road:  TX Forest Service [PR1].  300 acres. 100% contained.
  • Powerline:  Big Bend Natl Park [NPS].  1790 acres. 100% contained.
  • Watts:  TX Forest Service [FS].  1306 acres.  100% contained.

YEAR TO DATE STATS [from January 1st – February 19th]

  • 2016:  2395 Fires.  78,962 acres.
  • 2015:  2871 Fires.   26,847 acres.
  • 2014:  3095 Fires.   42,558 acres.
  • 2013:  1569 Fires.   10,961 acres.
  • 2012: 2889 Fires.   62,533 acres.
  • 2011:  2996 Fires.   52,391 acres.
  • 2010: 1407 Fires.   21,461 acres.

Since 2006 – 2015, the average of fires have been around 3900+ and scorching over 110,000 acres.

WEATHER FORECAST

A relatively progressive flow across the U.S. this week will provide an active weather pattern with a series of storms progressing from West to East. This will include the northwest quarter of the Nation as well as northern California and the Great Basin. The exception will be across the southwest and Plains regions this weekend where dry weather will continue. This prolonged dry period will transition on Sunday with showers and thunderstorms developing over the central and southern Plains. Showers and thunderstorms will expand along a frontal boundary through the southeast and Mid-Atlantic by the middle of next week before spreading north along the east coast. Late next week, a ridge of high pressure will attempt to strengthen along the Pacific coast with an overall drier and warmer pattern developing. [NIFC]

PREPAREDNESS LEVEL

We are currently at a Level 1.

[c] 2016 The #NWFireBlog

 

 

 

 

 

CHILE QUAKE PROMPTS TSUNAMI COASTAL ALERTS | UPDATE 1

QUAKE SUMMARY

Around 1354 PDT, a M8.3 Earthquake shook Chile with enough force that emergency tsunami warnings began being sounded to neighboring Countries, including the United States coastal communities.

The earthquake is said to be 8 miles deep and located at coordinates 31.6 South, 71.8 West along the Coast near Central Chile.

TSUNAMI WARNINGS

Alert to West Coasts @ 1601PDT 9/16/15

Public Tsunami Info Statement #1 broadcasted by the NWS located in Palmer AK for AK/ BC/ WA /OR and CA.

  • M7.9 earthquake
  • Occurred 1554 PDT or 3:54pm West Coast Time
  • Coordinates: 31.6 S, 71.9 W
  • Depth: 21 miles
  • Location:  Coast near Central Chile

States per their evaluation, these events can occur:

  • Earthquakes of this size can produce large tsunamis outside of the source area.
  • Can be dangerous to coastal areas.
  • The U.S. National Tsunami Center is evaluating the event.
  • The earthquake can produce large Tsunamis causing major damage to areas in the source location.

Reports from Hawaii – 9/16/15 @ 1924 Hours

The NWS from Ewa, Hawaii sends out an alert showing the earthquake has been upgraded to a M8.3

Activity Happening on Coastal areas in CALI – 9/16/15 @ 2245 Hours

An Alert was just broadcasted by Social Media sources that the LAFD will be in Unified Command at 0330 Hours beginning on 9/17/15 with Law Enforcement partners.  Command Post will be at Angels Gate Park in San Pedro.  This is due to the Tsunami Advisory.

RESOURCES

Red Cross

Update your information on the American Red Cross website under “Safe and Well” letting your friends and family know you are safe. This is a great site especially now that a major disaster has occurred.  Check out the site at https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/.

SOCIAL MEDIA REPORTS

  • California Closures:  All marinas, beaches and harbors will close at 0400 hours PDT on Thursday, 9/17/15.
  • President Bachelet: “call people evacuated to stay in higher areas.”
  • Australian Schools: Seismic waves from Chile earthquake recorded on seismometers in schools.
  • Alerts:  Tsunami activity expected to arrive in the LA area at 447am tomorrow. Stay off the beach and out of the water.
  • More CA Alerts/Warnings:  National Tsunami Warning Center issues Tsunami Advisory effective now San Onofre-Southeast of LA County-Ragged PtSan Luis Obispo
  • New Zealand on Alert:  Likely to only be a marine threat to the known hot-spot areas of NZ – Chatham Islands, East Cape, Coromandel, and Banks Peninsula.
  • Earthquake History:  Nepal’s April 25 quake was a 7.8, so this is likely to be the biggest earthquake on the planet so far this year.
  • Chileans feel Aftershocks:  Two significant aftershocks already reported from . 6.2M and 6.4M. Larger of two closer to land.
  • Observations:  Perspective: That’s as large as the 1906 earthquake that decimated San Francisco.
  • Injuries:  Chilean Interior minister Burgos asks people to remain calm and confirms no injuries have been reported as of yet.
  • Other areas Alerted:  Warnings for Hawaii and Peru … Quake felt in

MORE INFO TO BE POSTED

More info will be posted as it comes to light. We are thinking of those impacted in Chile and those who have loved ones there.

FOR YOUR SAFETY

Please beware of Coastal changes on the BC, WA, OR, CA Coasts due to a potential threat of large waves, sneeker waves and tsunamis. Please report anything you may see to authorities so they can track them and get necessary warnings out to additional agencies or to the general Public.

If they tell you, that you need to evacuate an area – please don’t question as to why or fight with them to stay.  They are doing their jobs and working to protect you and your family.

Thank you for reading our blog and following along with this Quake Disaster in Chile.

[c] 2015 The NW Fire Blog

 

 

NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH | Day 2 | Out-of-State Contact

REFLECTIONS

We talked in our last post, Day 1: Creating an Evacuation Plan.  Now, that you have created your plan, practiced your escape routes and are feeling confident about any disaster you may encounter – it’s time to see what Day 2’s Tip has in store for you and your family, friends and communities.

PURPOSE

There are actually two parts to this post, though the second will be a tool you can use if you have no family or friends to whom you can count on as an out-of-state contact as this post is mostly geared towards.  Flexibility should be part of the planning stage to give multiple ways to being Prepared when encountering all types of Disasters and Emergencies.

The main purpose of having an out-of-state contact is so that when there is a large incident that may occur in your area, you can contact your out-of-state person to let them you are okay.  This contact can serve as the point-of-contact for all of your designated family members or friends or for those to whom you have given their contact info to.

COMMUNICATIONS

Ways you can contact them is by phone [the phones may be down at the time of the event], email or by Social Media [if they are not overloaded by affected users] or through other friends and loved ones that can reach out to your  out-of-state-contact for you.

INFO NEEDED

This information as to the name of your Contact, their address, phone number, email address and other pertinent information should be kept with your “Go Kit” and in an agreed upon location where Family members can easily access.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

Practice several times a year with your Contact so you both know what to expect during a Disaster or an unplanned Emergency.  You could apply this during a wildland fire event, earthquake, tornado, serious flooding event, evacuation or any other type of incident.

BE PRO-ACTIVE, NOT REACTIVE

Creating an out-of-state contact now and being pro-active for that “disaster” event is the best advice we can give you.  Waiting at the last-minute could easily cause confusion, undue stress and panic if you have no idea who you should be contacting, especially if they don’t know you are trying to reach them during the “unplanned emergency”.

Phone lines may be down causing you to be unable to reach family members.  This may be the case even if you already have an established contact but at least, everyone has one person to go to, instead of each person asking if they have heard from so-so with unnecessary worry.  Contact through email or posting to Social Media may be down due to cell sites or internet hosts could have damaged equipment, but if they aren’t – you can notify your contact person in this manner.

Practice ways as if the communication has been lost and let your out-of-state contact the expectations in some of the many ways you may be in touch with them.  It is a great way to see what works and what doesn’t.

We know that putting this Tip into action may be more difficult now, as all communications are working properly than if in an actual disaster event when they may not be.

ALTERNATIVE TOOLS

So, you don’t have a friend or loved one outside of your home state and need an alternative tool to use.  The American Red Cross has a website and mobile app called “Safe and Well”. This is a site that allows you and your family members to log in to say you are Safe and Well.  Friends and loved ones can also “search” on the Red Cross website for you and your family members finding you are safe.

To find out more information about this site, go to the American Red Cross website:  https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/index.php.

[c] 2015 The NW Fire Blog

ACTIVE SHOOTER PREPAREDNESS TRAINING HOSTED BY BELLEVUE [WA] POLICE DEPARTMENT

Bellevue, Washington | The Bellevue Police Department has announced they will be presenting training for students, staff, parents and the community regarding Active Shooter Preparedness Training:  “A Discussion on School Safety”.

There are many great training videos and programs out there pertaining to these very real incidents happening all across the United States and around the world.  We don’t mean to frighten you but these are very real and to help save lives and getting Police there quickly is to know what to do in the event of an Active Shooter event.  This will not only save your life but the countless students and staff all around you.

Students, do you know to do if a person walked inside your school with a weapon and sought out teachers or even fellow students?  Would you know how to protect you and your fellow students around you? Are you familar with your school’s evacuation plan or places where you can safely evacuate to inside the school if you couldn’t exit the school?

These are all real and great questions to ask the Police Department.  Though we have just learned of these great trainings, we know they will be covering the basics from A-Z.  Students, parents, staff and the Community are invited to attend this great training.

These are all located in the Bellevue, Washington from 1800 – 1930 hours PST in each school’s Performing Arts Center.

January 27 – Interlake High School

February 10 – Newport High School

February 25 – Bellevue High School

Note:  The Bellevue School District asks parents to determine if this is appropriate for their children and able to participate in group discussions.

To learn more about this program, go to http://www.bsd405.org/safety.

[c] 2015 The NW Fire Blog

@nwfireblog [Twitter] | nwfireblog@comcast.net [Email] | The NW Fire Blog [Facebook]

 

Become “WinterWise” Event Hosted by Puyallup’s McLendon Hardware and Pierce County Utilities, DEM

Pierce County is gearing up to respond to winter weather, and community members are encouraged to do the same.

Residents can learn about Pierce County’s response efforts and how they can prepare for winter weather at the WinterWise Kickoff Event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 25 at McLendon Hardware at 11307 Canyon Road E. in Puyallup.

County staff from Public Works and Utilities and the Department of Emergency Management will provide information about county services during winter weather, as well as tips on how to make a family plan for emergencies and build an emergency kit. Children will be able to paint a snow plow that will be used on local roads during snow and ice events. Adults can pick up a list of recommended emergency kit items, and McLendon’s will offer a discount for shoppers that stop by the WinterWise and other vendor booths.

“Public Works and Utilities plays an important role in responding to winter weather, and we encourage people to become familiar with our programs so they know what to expect and who to contact if they need assistance,” said Brian Ziegler, Public Works and Utilities director. “Our WinterWise website also has resources on ways to be sustainable during winter celebrations, such as treecycling, and information on ways to keep sewer pipes functioning properly, such as not flushing wipes and keeping grease from holiday meals out of drains.”

The WinterWise Kickoff Event is part of Public Works and Utilities’ WinterWise outreach program to educate the community about the services the department provides during winter. Those services include response to urban and river flooding, windstorms, and snow and ice events, as well as information on storm cleanup and sustainable winter celebrations. Public Works and Utilities partnered with the Department of Emergency Management this year to help promote emergency preparedness.

“Creating an emergency kit and a family plan are crucial steps we all should take to be ready for winter weather,” said Lowell Porter, Department of Emergency Management director. “At the event, we’ll have the key information you need to get started.”

For more information on Pierce County’s winter services, visitwww.piercecountywa.org/winterwise.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Sheryl Rhinehart, Public Works and Utilities outreach coordinator
(253) 798-4655
srhineh@co.pierce.wa.us

Sheri Badger, Department of Emergency Management
(253) 798-2204
sbadger@co.pierce.wa.us

[Repost]

2014 The NW Fire Blog

September is National Preparedness Month – Building a Survival Kit

Creating a Survival Kit for your Family and Home prior to a disaster or emergency occurring is key to becoming prepared enabling to help save many lives.   The Kit should be easy enough to transport should you have to leave your home or whereever you may be.

WHAT SHOULD BE IN MY SURVIVAL KIT?

The Basics of a Survival Kit.

  • (1) First Aid Kit * See below the Supply List for a Kit *
  • (1) Gallon of Water for each person per day up to (3) days for evacuation; (2) weeks if for home.
  • Non-perishable food, easy to prepare [don’t have to cook] for up to (3) days for evacuation; (2) weeks if for home.
  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • Battery powered or handcrank NOAA radio.
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items.
  • (7) day supply of medications.
  • Cell phones with chargers.
  • Copies of your Driver’s license, Lease/Copy of Deed to home, Insurance policies, Birth Certificates, Passports, Verification of residency [proof of address].
  • Family and emergency contact information.
  • Emergency blanket.
  • Map[s] of area.

Additional items to Consider for your Survival Kit.

  • Hearing aids, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, or any additional medical supplies.
  • Baby supplies [bottles, formula, blanket, diapers, baby food]
  • Games and activities for the kids.
  • Two-radios.
  • Extra set of car keys, house keys.
  • Manual can opener.

Recommended Items to Keep on Hand for Area Related Disasters

  • Whistle
  • Surgical masks
  • Matches
  • Rain gear
  • Towels
  • Work gloves
  • Tools / Supplies for securing your home
  • Extra clothing, hat, sturdy shoes
  • Duct tape
  • Scissors
  • Household liquid bleach
  • Entertainment items
  • Blanket or Sleeping Bags
  • Plastic Sheeting
  • Matches

* First Aid Kit should contain the following items *

  • Absorbent compress dressings
  • Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
  • Adhesive tape
  • Antibiotic ointment packets
  • Antiseptic wipe packets
  • Small packets of aspirin
  • Blanket [Space Blanket]
  • Scissors
  • Oral thermometer [w/o mercury]
  • Triangular bandages
  • Tweezers
  • Non-latex gloves
  • Antiseptic solution or towlettes
  • Instant cold packs
  • Sterile eye wash
  • Benadryl
  • Peptobismal
  • Tums
  • Non-stick sterile pads
  • Second Skin for blister treatment
  • Callomae lotion
  • Emergency phone numbers, Contacts
  • Safety pins

““We are not preparing for the world we live in – we are preparing for the world we find ourselves in.” ― Michael Mabee, Prepping for a Suburban or Rural Community: Building a Civil Defense Plan for a Long-Term Catastrophe

(c) 2014 The NW Fire Blog | @nwfireblog [Twitter] | The NW Fire Blog [Facebook] | http://thefireblog.com [Fire Blog] | nwfireblog@comcast.net [Email]